Abraham Lincoln: Issued the Emancipation Proclamation

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What did Abraham Lincoln do?
Many may say eh made things worse, but i beg to argue. Abraham Lincoln is the reason for the civil war people say, but look where it got us! The union won, and the slaves are free. During the Civil war (1861-1865) many actions occurred. When Lincoln was elected President in 1861 South Carolina seceded followed by 6 other sates, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. Four other states threatened to secede as well. Then a month after the 7 seceded they formed a Government. Later on March 4th when Lincoln was elected he said that he didn't want to take away slavery from the states that already had slavery existing and common in their state. He also said that he would not deal or except secession either. Fort Sumter started the Civil war. Lincoln was sending supplies to Fort Sumter and told them before hand so they would be aware. When they got there South Carolina feared a trick, so they said they would take the supplies then surrender, but his offer was not taken, and thats when the first shot was fired. April 12, 1861 the Civil War had begun. On January 27th, 1862 Lincoln allowed the Union to launch unified aggressive action against the Confederacy. January 1863 Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation that freed the slaves in the states that were still in rebellion on January 1st 1863. The Gettysburg Battlefield was dedicated as a national cemetery, this was a huge war. Over 54 thousand soldiers were killed. The south wasn't strong enough, and the North succeeded. On April 7th 1865 General Grant called upon General Lee to surrender. Lee sent home his troops and the Civil War ended. Many battles were fought and the Union won over the Confederate. On April 14th President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth. John was obsessed with avenging the Confederate defeat. ||| |||
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