Abortion: Moral Staus of the Fetus

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Preparing For and Taking Exams
Marie Frentress (4227116)
American Military University
Professor Alvina Alexander
August 28, 2011

Preparing For and Taking Exams
Exams normally account for a major portion of a student’s overall class grade. Preparing for those exams can be both challenging and boring at the same time. Ngadiman (2006) states that “Preparation for classroom tests is necessary to perform well. Good preparation is almost the key to confidence. Good confidence will lower down anxiety.” (p. 2) Studying for exams requires dedication and concentration; these traits are essential to achieve academic success. “A good test-taker is always prepared for the test. He knows what to do before, during, and after the test.” (Ngadiman, 2006, p. 1) There are several different types of exams. The most common type of exam is made up of multiple-choice questions. “Despite the fashionable criticism of this method, standardized multiple-choice exams…are well suited for assessing students’ recall of factual knowledge and their ability to solve problems.” (Hoachlander, 1998, p. 2) Other types of exams are open ended questions, true or false, fill in the blank, or short essays. Erbe (2007) wants her students to learn more than facts, so she never gives multiple-choice exams and usually includes a mix of short answer questions and longer essays in her exams. Asking the teacher about which type of exam he or she will be administering will help a student to better prepare for that exam. Achievement tests can be administered as a take-home exam or a classroom exam. Many teachers, however, tend to prefer a classroom exam than a take-home exam. They believe that a classroom exam is more valid and reliable than a take-home exam. In addition, a classroom exam is easy to administer and to control. (Ngadiman, 2006, p. 2) Open book exams give students too much security where they more than likely will not study or prepare for the exam. Erbe (2007)...
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