Abortion

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Abortion
There are many different views on abortion therefore making it a very controversial subject to discuss. The two main views on abortion are the “pro-choice” view and the “pro-life” view as publicised in the article “Abortion: A Moderate View” written by L W. Sumner. These established views are either for or against abortion although they do not take into consideration the many different factors regarding abortion. The article helps define the similarity and differences in the established views and explain the many flaws both these views have in today’s society. Along with the established views Sumner describes the moderate view and its purpose in society. The established views on abortion are the two most commonly used views. The “pro-Choice” position is the liberal view on abortion which states that abortion is not immoral. This view claims that a fetus has no moral standing. Moral standing applies to anything that is not an item and has some established moral rights and cannot be wronged ( Sumner,1992). The liberal view compares abortion to contraception stating that they have the same justification therefore the choice of abortion is left to a women’s discretion. The opposing view would be the “pro-life” view. This conservative view believes that a fetus does have moral standing throughout all stages of pregnancy therefore making abortion morally wrong. The article continues to state that since a fetus does have moral standings, an abortion is as equally justified to infanticide and homicide, therefore women does not have the discretion to seek an abortion. Although these view have two very different concepts they have some similarities. Both established views leave out two important factors one may consider when choosing abortion. One factor both these views disregard is the timing of the abortion. The established views commit to the idea that the moral standing of the fetus is the same throughout the pregnancy. They do not take into consideration the growth and changes that occur during pregnancy. Another similarity these views share are the significant reason one may state in choosing abortion. Both views ignore the explanations for why a mother may choose an abortion. The conservative view believes there is not significant reason for choosing an abortion and the liberal view believes one does not need a significant reason for choosing an abortion. Both these views agree that when and why an abortion is performed is irrelevant because a fetus either has full moral standing or doesn’t . These established views have many flaws In a Western democracy. A Moderate abortion takes into consideration the time and grounds, that determine the choice of an abortion. These are the two factors that the establish views do not acknowledge. The public agrees in the importance of the timing of the abortion and the grounds in which an abortion may take place. When considering the timing, most people tend not to be bothered by women who choose abortion at the very early stages of pregnancy although they have trouble agreeing with abortion in the later stages of pregnancy. The established views state that a fetus either has moral status or it doesn’t, which is a flaw according to Sumner. Another flaw in the established views is the ignorance in considering grounds of the situation. Sumner explains that the grounds for those who consider abortion has been divided into four categories; therapeutic (when the mothers health of life is in risk due to the pregnancy), eugenic (the fetus is in risk of deformity), humanitarian (pregnancy is forced upon due to rape or incest) and socioeconomic (poverty, desertion, family size etc.) (Sumner,1992). These are all important issues in a Western democracy. These are the factors that the public considers when deciding whether or not an abortion is acceptable. Since the established views do not acknowledge these at all, Sumner states that these are to be seen as flaws. A moderate view...
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