Abolition.

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Abolition
When North American colonies had settled, slavery was part of the colonies success with the trade market. In 1619 a Dutch ship had carried African slaves on the docks of Jamestown to trade with the colonist. For two hundred years the body of slavery was completely normal. When the African Americans had started to revolt there was a debate against ending slavery in the United States. The controversy between the states arose two types of people Abolitionist and Radical abolitionist. In the 1840s through the 1850s the controversies with ending slavery most effective way was radical abolition. The way to end slavery was in two methods abolitionist and radical abolition which had its negatives and positive effects. Radical abolition has created a deeply effective way to end slavery. The radicals were actually by being aggressive they were not using democratic ways to abolish slavery. Using this method was the only way to disconnect the south from the slaves. Slavery was deeply imbedded in the southern economics. The slaves were cheap labor which benefited the South dramatically. The approach of violence may be aggressive and uncivilized but repeating history in using radical ways seems just right. Throughout the years, such as the American Revolution and the War of 1812, a violent approach in achieving a goal always leads to success. Radical abolition was the only way for the south to abolish slavery from the United States. The radical leaders had the nation confused on whether slavery was humane. Radical abolitionist Fredrick Douglass was an escaped slave and had come to the North in trying to accomplish everything he couldn’t do in the south. He became a successful preacher and Douglass sought to free the slaves within the limitations of the Constitution. He thought only by keeping the slave states within the American Union could the federal government then be used to rid the nation of slavery. Douglass came to view the...
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