Abigail Adams fought for the rights of women and the African Americans

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Although, the Declaration of Independence stated, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and The Pursuit Of Happiness" it only gave rights to some. The Declaration failed to extend the same rights to women and the African Americans. The Declaration was mainly directed towards the free white men’s rights. Abigail Adams fought for the rights of women and the African Americans.

To begin, Abigail Adams made a plea for women’s rights. Women were considered inferior to men, and they did not have any rights to vote or own property. Most women cooked, did the laundry, and nursed the sick soldiers in the battles. Some women even disguised themselves as men and fought in the battles. Abigail believed that women should be treated equally because they have the same potential as men. Abigail expressed that women should not submit to laws not made in their interest, nor should they be happy with the simple role of being their husband’s companion. Abigail expressed these ideas in the letters she sent to her husband, John Adams, and requested for women to have a voice and representation in the government.

In addition, Abigail obstinately opposed slavery. African Americans were not treated fairly. They were treated as property and often sold into slavery. African Americans were enslaved and not paid for their work. African Americans did not have the right to vote or own any property. The Declaration promised freedom and equality to all, but it did not extend it to the African Americans. Slaves were not treated fairly as the colonists. Also, the Declaration stated people had unalienable rights, which could not be taken away by the government, but the slaves did not have a say in the government or rights that protected them. Abigail believed African Americans deserved freedom too and wrote to her husband, “I wish most sincerely...
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