Abc Diploma in the Theory and Practice of Counselling (Therapeutic Work) Level 4. Counselling Specialisms Report

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COUNSELLING THE PROBLEMATIC DRINKER FROM THE PERSON-CENTRED PERSPECTIVE WORD COUNT: 2749

ACKNOWLEGEMENTS

The writer gives thanks to:
Paul, for caring enough to challenge; for always seeing their potential and facilitating movement towards it, even when the writer doesn’t see it themselves. Joseph, for his unconditional valuing. A flower cannot bloom without sunshine and fertile soil. Providing space where the writer can scrutinise their beliefs, and challenge, reinforce or redefine them. Enabling them to grow personally, academically and professionally. Their mother, who provided the time for the report to be written. The therapists’ who graciously gave of themselves by answering the writer’s questionnaire. Thus broadening the writers understanding, by taking it out of the purely theoretical realm, enabling them to more deeply explore their own beliefs and practice. Impact, for ensuring the information in their handout was accurate and relevant. Their peers who completed their feedback sheet (see Appendix 1).

Their input enabled the writer to produce this report.

Unfortunately the writer is unable to comment on their experience of team-working, as personal circumstances led their partner’s college attendance to be sporadic and their phone calls and emails were not returned. CONTENTS

1.INTRODUCTIONP. 4

2.METHODOLOGYP. 4

3.RESEARCHP. 5

4.COUNSELLING THE PROBLEMATIC DRINKERP. 7
4.1THE CORE CONDITIONSP. 7

4.2THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCEP. 10

4.3COUNSELLING THE ALCOHOL-AFFECTED CLIENTP. 12

4.4LIMITATIONSP. 13

5.THE CYCLE OF CHANGEP. 16
5.1.DIAGRAM OFP. 17

6.MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEVINGP. 22
6.1VIEWS FOR AND AGAINSTP. 23

6.2WRITERS VIEW ONP. 24

7.CONCLUSION P. 25

8.RECOMMENDATIONSP. 26
9.SELF-ASSESSMENTP.27

10.APPENDICESP. 31
10.1APPENDIX 1 – FEEDBACK SHEETSP. 31

9.2APPENDIX 2 – ABOUT THE QUESTIONNAIREP. 41

9.3APPENDIX 3 – THE RESULTSP. 43

9.4APPENDIX 4 – THE SPIRIT OF MI P. 93

11.REFERENCESP. 94

12.BIBLIOGRAPHY P. 97
1. INTRODUCTION

Substance misuse isn’t new. According to Archibald et al. (2004) in 3000 years BC it was recorded that man abuses anything that rewards for minimum effort. The cabinet office strategy unit (2003) state, in Britain since 1991, people dying from chronic conditions linked to alcohol misuse has almost doubled.

The writer will now explore person-centred counselling and the problematic drinker. Looking at: Research available.
The core conditions.
The therapeutic alliance.
Counselling the alcohol-affected client.
The limitations of person-centred counselling (PCC).
The cycle of change.
Motivational Interviewing (MI).
They will then draw their conclusions.

2. METHODOLOGY

Theoretical Concepts
Books
Articles
Internet
Quotes
Own Research

3. RESEARCHING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PERSON-CENTRED COUNSELLING

The writer found references to two studies involving PCC and problematic drinkers:

Rogers (2004) discussed the findings of Ends and Page’s (1957) work with chronic alcoholics. The results found a two-factor theory of learning therapy extremely unhelpful, bordering on harmful. Client-centred showed the most positive change, and greatest lasting improvement. Rogers (2004) felt this was because the learning theory therapist’s aim was to be detached and impersonal, displaying minimal humanity and personality. Rogers (2004, p 47) postulates that working so impersonally with someone your dealings with them are devoid of human emotion is rarely beneficial. “To withhold one’s self as a person and to deal with the other person as an object does not have a high probability of being helpful”. Citing Miller’s (1995) research on psychotherapy and problematic drinkers, Waller et al. (2004) explicate,...
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