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Branches are stored as named directories within Subversion; you create a branch simply by copying the trunk to a new location. Subversion’s internals use lazy copies to make this lazy copies copying process efficient, and these lazy copies are the basis of Subversion’s tagging support too. Whenever you copy a file or directory, Subversion simply stores a link to the original. When you make a change to the copy, Subversion records those changes as differences against the original. Using lazy copies Subversion can very quickly copy large trees of files using almost zero space, ideal for branches and tags. You can create branches off other branches, but typically you won’t want to; we’ve come across many developers who have been put off branching for life because of some bad experiences with overly complicated branching in a project.

Branches are stored as named directories within Subversion; you create a branch simply by copying the trunk to a new location. Subversion’s internals use lazy copies to make this lazy copies copying process efficient, and these lazy copies are the basis of Subversion’s tagging support too. Whenever you copy a file or directory, Subversion simply stores a link to the original. When you make a change to the copy, Subversion records those changes as differences against the original. Using lazy copies Subversion can very quickly copy large trees of files using almost zero space, ideal for branches and tags. You can create branches off other branches, but typically you won’t want to; we’ve come across many developers who have been put off branching for life because of some bad experiences with overly complicated branching in a project.

Branches are stored as named directories within Subversion; you create a branch simply by copying the trunk to a new location. Subversion’s internals use lazy copies to make this lazy copies copying process efficient, and these lazy copies are the basis of Subversion’s tagging support too. Whenever you copy a file or directory, Subversion simply stores a link to the original. When you make a change to the copy, Subversion records those changes as differences against the original. Using lazy copies Subversion can very quickly copy large trees of files using almost zero space, ideal for branches and tags. You can create branches off other branches, but typically you won’t want to; we’ve come across many developers who have been put off branching for life because of some bad experiences with overly complicated branching in a project.

Branches are stored as named directories within Subversion; you create a branch simply by copying the trunk to a new location. Subversion’s internals use lazy copies to make this lazy copies copying process efficient, and these lazy copies are the basis of Subversion’s tagging support too. Whenever you copy a file or directory, Subversion simply stores a link to the original. When you make a change to the copy, Subversion records those changes as differences against the original. Using lazy copies Subversion can very quickly copy large trees of files using almost zero space, ideal for branches and tags. You can create branches off other branches, but typically you won’t want to; we’ve come across many developers who have been put off branching for life because of some bad experiences with overly complicated branching in a project.

Branches are stored as named directories within Subversion; you create a branch simply by copying the trunk to a new location. Subversion’s internals use lazy copies to make this lazy copies copying process efficient, and these lazy copies are the basis of Subversion’s tagging support too. Whenever you copy a file or directory, Subversion simply stores a link to the original. When you make a change to the copy, Subversion records those changes as differences against the original. Using lazy copies Subversion can very quickly copy large trees of files using almost zero space,...
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