9/11 Conspiracy

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 245
  • Published : May 2, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
5. In this course I have assigned a conspiracy debunking book on widespread conspiracy allegations concerning the events of 9/11/01. That book, compiled by the journal POPULAR MECHANICS: Debunking 9/11 Myths: Why Conspiracy Theories Can’t Stand Up, attempts to silence the avalanche of suspicion triggered by attacks that day. You can obtain the essence of those suspicions by consulting the many "Truther" sites on the Web. To a general reader, explain what we ought to think about 9/11 in the wake of this confrontation over what actually happened on that fateful day and why. Explain why you reached this conclusion. Address this question: How successful can the most thorough debunking be in the wake of allegations of the sort made by the Truther movement? I own several books and CD's making the case for conspiracy for your use if you wish to consult one or more of them. Of course, the internet is full of that material. You might want to entitle your essay, “Can conspiracy doubts ever be put to rest?”.

From the minute the first airplane hit the World Trade Center on that fateful morning September 11th, 2001 the entire nation was moved. Then when two more planes came crashing into the other tower and the Pentagon, the nation was crushed. It was the most fatal terrorist attack ever committed against the United Stated killing nearly 3,000 people. Thousands of children were left with one parent or even became orphans. September 11th quickly became our biggest national tragedy since the JFK assassination. After the attacks, many changes could be seen in the country beginning with the government. Immediately after the attacks security shot up, which quickly sacrificed some citizen freedom. For example, the USA Patriot Act was passed in 2001 to give law enforcement agencies surveillance powers over U.S citizens. This led to creation of the Information Awareness Office whose goal was to develop technology that could collect and process massive amounts of information about every individual in the United States. The information would include Internet activity, credit card purchase histories, airline ticket purchases, car rentals, medical records, utility bills, tax returns, and other available data all of which would be used to trace patterns of behavior that could help predict terrorist activities. Another change that became apparent after the attacks was a change in the American mentality. There was a surge of nationalism that rose in the country for the first time since World War II, people began rallying around the popularized phrase, "United We Stand," in hopes of remaining resilient and keeping the American spirit alive despite the devastating attack. But at the same time there escalated a storm of suspicion leading to stories that would challenge the phrase “United We Stand”, stories better known as conspiracy theories.

Conspiracies first became publically voiced by a collective of organizations and individuals known as the Truth Movement. Supporters of the movement, or Truthers, question the accepted explanation provided by the government of the planes unknowingly being hi-jacked by a terrorist organization. Instead they suggest that the United States government took part, in some way, in the events that occurred on September 11th. “Truthers” conspiracies can be divided into two main forms: LIHOP (Let it happen on purpose) and MIHOP (Made it happen on purpose). Pretty self-explanatory, the LIHOP belief is that at least a few key members in the Bush administration had some foreknowledge of the attacks and ignored them or even weakened the nations defense to ensure the planes were not intercepted. For example, Michael Meacher, former member of Tony Blair’s cabinet is one who “claims that the United States knowingly failed to stop the attacks”. Another motive for this conspiracy is suspected insider trading due to the large amount of put options placed on United Airlines and American Airlines stocks...
tracking img