80's Music Analysis

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  • Topic: Hall & Oates, The Human League, Rock music
  • Pages : 3 (1007 words )
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  • Published : March 5, 2013
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“Don’t You Want Me,” The Human League (1981)

“Don’t You Want Me,” was written by Human league’s lead vocalist Philip Oakey, background singer Adrian Wright as well as keyboardist Jo Callis. This song was unusual in that one of the female backing singers took a lead role, as the song was structured as a duet.The Human League thought of themselves as very cutting-edge, their music was based on electronic sounds and considered guitars "archaic and antique." Lead singer Phil Oakey has been quoted as saying this song is not a love story but more,”a nasty song about sexual power politics.” Oakley originally didn't want "Don't You Want Me" released as a single because they felt it to be to mainstream, he could have never imagined the international success the song has gained.

This song is about a guy who meets a cocktail waitress, falls in love with her and turns her into a star, but soon after their love deteriorates. Through the duet you are able to see both sides of the story, the man has a more chauvinistic attitude towards the woman while the woman has her own newfound sense of independence from their relationship. The constant repetition of “ Don’t you want me baby,” signifies the feelings of lost love as well as the following lines: “You know I don't believe you when you say that you don't need me, It's much too late to find You think you've changed your mind

You'd better change it back or we will both be sorry”

Those last lines represent a mutual feeling of love as well as resentment, neither party will admit whether or not their dependent on the other, but they can admit there will be a synthpop, the lead male vocals have little to no vibrato and are very clear articulation of the lyrics. The instruments used to create this piece included a synthesizer as well as a keyboard and an MCI console. The lead female vocals run along the border of being sung and talked, there is little dynamic and the pronunciation of the lyrics are very clear as well. The...
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