7 Habit of Highly Effective Teens

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In the book 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, Sean Covey lays out seven ideas to help teens become more open, productive, and successful people. Covey's seven points are simple ones that can be easily adopted. He achieves this effect by providing concrete examples which teenagers can relate to. This technique as well as his use of diagrams, pictures, and inspirational tidbits show his understanding of the teenage individual's place in life.

Each of the seven habits was significant to some aspect of my own life. However, of these seven, I was especially enlightened by two habits that correspond closely to my waterloos. The first would be to "Put first things first." I find myself challenged by this whenever I am tasked to take on the responsibility of leading a team. When such a position is entrusted to me, I always find myself skeptical about whether my groupmates will be able to meet a certain standard. The act of delegating proves to be a challenge, and I usually end up doing most of the work. In the end, because of my unwillingness to delegate tasks to others, I neglect to put my first priorities first. Along with this realization is the understanding that valuing my other responsibilities will inevitably involve trusting others to do their fair share of work. After all, this is part of managing my time wisely and being a good leader. Perhaps this method will entail more time and effort in clearly communicating roles and establishing benchmarks to other team members, but it is a sacrifice that needs to be made in order to fulfill more important commitments. The second would be to "Sharpen the saw." I often find a million and one things on my to-do list. To get by, I try to spend every waking moment reading, writing papers, or studying for tests. I guess the rationale behind my strategy is that if I work continuously, I should finish sooner than later. However, this is rarely the effect. Instead, I end up checking and re-checking work that...
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