6.05 the Harlem Renaissance

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  • Topic: Jazz, Duke Ellington, Music
  • Pages : 2 (428 words )
  • Download(s) : 161
  • Published : January 2, 2013
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Part I Questions
1.In "Daybreak Express" what happens with the beat of the music and the tempo? The music gets faster and faster.
2.What mode of transportation was a favorite of Ellington's and is imitated in several of his songs? Trains are Ellington’s favorite mode of transportation and is imitated in several of his songs. 3.What song was the theme song of Duke Ellington’s band?

Take the "A" Train was the theme song of Duke Ellington's band. 4.What instrument does Ellington use to set the mood or rhythm of some of his songs, such as in Sophisticated Lady? Duke Ellington used the piano to set the mood or rhythm of some of his songs. 5.What does “program music” do?

Program music is instrumental music that helps tell a story with episodes or reveals facets of a character.

Part II Questions
1.Find an example of onomatopoeia in "Dream Boogie" and another in "The Weary Blues." An example of onomatopoeia in Dream Boogie is pop and another in The Weary Blues is thump. 2.Find an example of assonance in "Dream Boogie" and another in "The Weary Blues." An example of assonance in Dream boogie is pop, re-bop, mop and in The Weary Bluesis lazy sway & poor piano moan. 3.In "The Weary Blues" look at the format of the poem. Notice the lines which are indented. How does this compare to "call and response" used in Jazz? When they say things like Relating to blues like “Oh Blues” or “Sweet Blues” its kind’ve like them saying “Yes” or “Oh Yeah.” 4.In "The Weary Blues" there are several examples of personification. List at least two examples. In the Weary Blues the personification is piano moan & sleep like a rock. 5.In "The Weary Blues" what words set a tone for the poem? What is the tone? In the Weary Blues the words that set a tone for the poem are moan, sad, troubles, weary. The tone is sad and depressed. 6.In "Dream Boogie" look at the beat of the lines. What happens as the poem evolves? How does this compare with "Daybreak Express" by Duke Ellington?...
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