4g Wireless Technology: Motivation For 4G Research Before 3G Has Been Not Deployed

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4G Wireless TECHNOLOGY

E.C.E DEPARTMENT

Presented By
Gomati Damle
8th Semester
USN:2AG09EC010
Gomatidamle@gmail.com

CONTENT:
1. ABSTRACT.
2. INTRODUCTION.
3. WHAT IS 4G.
4. MOTIVATION FOR 4G RESEARCH BEFORE 3G HAS BEEN NOT DEPLOYED? 5. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 3G AND 4G.
6. WHAT IS NEEDED TO BUILD 4G NETWORKA OF FUTURE?
7. APPLICATIONS.
8. ADVANTAGES.
9. LIMITATIONS.
10. COCLUSION.

4G TECHNOLOGY
(MOBILE COMMUNICATION)

Abstract:
Third-generation (3G) mobile networks face a new rival: so-called 4G. And, astonishingly, the new networks may even be profitable. Alvin Toffler, an eminent futurologist, once said, “THE future always comes too fast, but in the wrong order”. The state of wireless telecoms is a classic example. Even as 3G mobile networks are being switched on around the world, a couple of years later than planned, attention is shifting to what comes next: a group of newer technologies that are, inevitably, being called Fourth Generation Mobile Networks (4G). 4G is all about an integrated, global network that's based on an open systems approach. The goal of 4G is to replace the current proliferation of core cellular networks with a single worldwide cellular core network standard based on IP for control, video, packet data, and VoIP. This integrated 4Gmobile system provides wireless users an affordable broadband mobile access solutions for the applications of secured wireless

Mobile Internet services with value-added QoS. This paper gives the reasons for the evolution of 4G, though 3G has not deployed completely. And then gives the information on the structure of the transceiver for 4G followed by the modulation techniques needed for the 4G. Later this gives the information about the 4G processing .Finally concludes with futuristic views for the quick emergence of this emerging technology. introduction

While 3G hasn't quite arrived, designers are already thinking about 4G technology. With it comes challenging RF and baseband design headaches. Cellular service providers are slowly beginning to deploy third-generation (3G) cellular services. As access technology increases, voice, video, multimedia, and broadband data services are becoming integrated into the same network. The hope once envisioned for 3G as a true broadband service has all but dwindled away. It is apparent that 3G systems, while maintaining the possible 2-Mbps data rate in the standard, will realistically achieve 384-kbps rates. To achieve the goals of true broadband cellular service, the systems have to make the leap to a fourth-generation (4G) network. This is not merely a numbers game. 4G is intended to provide high speed, high capacity, low cost per bit, IP based services. The goal is to have data rates up to 20 Mbps, even when used in such scenarios as a vehicle traveling 200 kilometers per hour. The move to 4G is complicated by attempts to standardize on a single 3G protocol. Without a single standard on which to build, designers face significant additional challenges. What is 4G?

4G takes on a number of equally true definitions, depending on who you are talking to. In simplest terms, 4G is the next generation of wireless networks that will replace 3G networks sometimes in future. In another context, 4G is simply an initiative by academic R&D labs to move beyond the limitations and problems of 3G which is having trouble getting deployed and meeting its promised performance and throughput. In reality, as of first half of 2002, 4G is a conceptual framework for or a discussion point to address future needs of a universal high speed wireless network that will interface with wire line backbone network seamlessly. Motivation for 4G Research Before 3G Has Not Been Deployed?

* 3G performance may not be sufficient...
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