28th Amendment

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Hill, Patricia
Garth, Anderson
Period 5
29, October, 2012
The Instant Runoff Amendment It is time for America to stop choosing its president by an archaic, confusing, and undemocratic method. As the 2000 election has shown, using the Electoral College lets a candidate win the Presidency even if a larger number of voters prefer and vote for someone else. Getting rid of the Electoral College may be very hard, but by writing a 28th amendment, it will definitely get rid of them for sure, but there is a long process for this abolishment and writing an amendment. The Electoral College must be abolished so that the “election” must be fair. The process of creating a new amendment is found in Article Five in the constitution which describes the process necessary to amend the Constitution. It establishes two methods of proposing amendments by Congress or by a national convention requested by the states. Under the first method, Congress can propose an amendment by a two-thirds vote (of a quorum, not necessarily of the entire body) of the Senate and of the House of Representatives. Under the second method, two-thirds of the state legislatures may convene and "apply" to Congress to hold a national convention, whereupon Congress must call such a convention for the purpose of considering amendments. To date, only the first method (proposal by Congress) has been used. Once proposed, whether submitted by Congress or by a national convention. Amendments must then be ratified by three-fourths of the states to take effect. Article Five gives Congress the option of requiring ratification by state legislatures or by special conventions assembled in the states. The convention method of ratification has been used only once (to approve the 21st Amendment). Article Five currently places only one limitation on the amending power—that no amendment can deprive a state of its equal...
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