21 Irrefrutable Laws of Leadership

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  • Topic: Leadership, Leadership development, Law
  • Pages : 8 (3418 words )
  • Download(s) : 154
  • Published : June 30, 2010
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The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership is a book by Dr. John Maxwell wherein he summarizes the leadership characteristics that he has learned over more than 30 years. People continually asked Dr. Maxwell, “If you could take everything you’ve learned in all your years of training in leadership and boil it down to a short list what would it be?” The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership is his answer to that question. In this book, Dr. Maxwell communicates each law very clearly and explains it in a way that is easy to understand and remember. Because it is easy to remember the 21 laws, the book even more valuable. Even after reading the book, I still remember key laws that I should be working at on a daily basis. The stories that Dr. Maxwell tells in the book helped me understand how each of these laws will assist me in becoming a leader that people want to follow. The stories of great leaders like Ray Kroc of McDonald’s, President Roosevelt and Princess Diana add clarity to the 21irrefutable laws. Dr. Maxwell makes each person’s life story a journey into leadership excellence. He shows how they each achieved great success in relation to one or more of the 21 laws and made a positive impact in the lives of people. For this book review, I will summarize each of the 21 laws, reveal my score from the leadership evaluation and state its relevance to my life or ministry. The Law of the Lid: “Leadership ability determines a person’s level of effectiveness” (Maxwell, 2007, p. 1). Leadership ability is always the lib on personal and organizational effectiveness. Whatever needs to be accomplished in an organization is limited by leadership ability. Personal and organizational effectiveness is proportionate to the strength of leadership. My leadership evaluation score in this area is a five. My ability as a leader will limit or place a lid on my personal growth and the growth of the organization I lead. Our church will not rise beyond the level of my leadership ability. I need to work on enlisting the help of others when I am faced with challenges and relinquish the ‘I’ll do it myself attitude.’ The Law of Influence: “The true measure of leadership is influence – nothing more, nothing less” (Maxwell, 2007, p. 11). If you don’t have influence you will never lead others. The true test of a leader is to ask him to create positive change in an organization. A person that cannot create change, cannot lead. Being a leader is not about being first, or being an entrepreneur or being the most knowledgeable, or being a manager. Being a leader is not just holding a leadership position. It’s not the position that makes a leader, but the leader who makes a position. Positional leadership especially does not work in volunteer organizations. The very essence of all power to influence lies in getting the other person to participate. He who thinks he leads , but has no followers, is only taking a walk. To redirect followers they must be influenced to changed course. My leadership evaluation score in this area is an eight. Although this score is high, I can improve by being more directive with certain people. My leadership is not based upon the position of Senior Pastor; my leadership is based on my ability to influence people. Two of the misconceptions about leadership that apply to me are: The Management Myth and The Entrepreneur Myth. There are key leadership skills I need to be a great leader as the Senior Pastor, but lacking them as an entrepreneur did not prove detrimental to my success. The Law of Process: ‘Leadership develops daily, not in a day” (Maxwell, 2007, p. 23). Leadership is learned over time, it is the capability to develop and improve their skills that distinguishes leaders from their followers. Successful leaders are learners. What matters most is what you do day by day over the long haul. Growth is a process and there are five phases in the process: 1. I don’t know what I don’t know; 2. I...
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