2. the Importance of Tourism

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2. The Importance
of Tourism153
500
400
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414
124
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2.1 TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL
TOURISM
2004 was the most successful year ever
for the travel industry, with more than
760 million arrivals globally – an increase
of around ten per cent on 2003. After
three years of stagnation following the
September 11 attacks, the SARS crisis and
the Iraq war, almost all destination markets recorded substantial growth. Once again, the Asian market proved the most
dynamic: with 153 million international
arrivals and growth of 29 per cent, Asia
was able to strengthen its position as the
second most popular travel destination after Europe in 2004. Asia is now a long way ahead of America, which itself achieved a
ten per cent increase in international arrivals, bringing the figure to 124 million. The European countries saw 414 million
international arrivals (up four per cent).
Positive growth rates were also enjoyed by
the Middle East, up 20 per cent to 35 million, and Africa with a seven per cent rise to 33 million international arrivals. In total,
around 80 to 85 per cent of international
travel was intra-continental, while the remaining 15 to 20 per cent of travel was to destinations on a different continent. Asia
itself benefited from most of the growth in
travel on that continent, although European
destinations also proved popular.
In 2004, Europe’s share of all worldwide
arrivals was just under 55 per cent, down
by around 5 percentage points since 1995.
According to the World Tourism Organization (WTO) forecasts, this trend is set to continue, with Europe’s market share
falling to just under 46 per cent by 2020.
However, given the overall growth in the
global travel market, this will still mean
average growth of three per cent a year for
Europe to 2020. Against this background, it
is particularly encouraging that Germany’s
ten per cent increase in the number of arrivals in 2004 was significantly above the figure for Europe as a whole. Germany is
thus keeping pace with the worldwide
growth in tourism and has shown that it
can compete internationally and can position itself on the global market as a destination for both holidaymakers and business travellers. In 2004, the economic conditions which
tend to affect travel and holidays were
shaped by a booming overseas economy
coupled with more subdued growth in
Europe, low inflation and interest rates,
a euro that remained strong against the
US dollar and rocketing oil prices.
The economic importance of tourism
Various key indicators can be used to determine the importance of tourism for the German economy. However, since tourism
benefits a wide variety of sectors of the
economy, and its economic importance is
measured not in terms of goods produced,
but by consumer numbers, i.e. tourists, it is
more difficult to express its importance in
terms of GDP than would be the case for,
say, the engineering or agricultural sectors.
Various international tourism organisations
are currently seeking better methods of
benchmarking for the future. This is taking
place on two main levels. Firstly, the WTO
and the European Commission are attempting to define the contribution tourism makes to GDP with the aid of pilot studies,
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ACCORDING TO WTO FIGURES, THERE WERE 760 MILLION
INTERNATIONAL ARRIVALS IN 2004
Europe
+4 %
Asia/Pacific
+29 %
Americas
+10 %
Middle
East
+20 %
Africa
+7 %
Arrivals in millions
■ Arrivals in millions ■ 2004 increase (provisional) in millions Source: WTO 2005Source: Federal Statistical Office 2005
Overnight stays (million) 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0
2. THE IMPORTANCE OF TOURISM
including studies being carried out by the
Statistical Offices, and also with the aid
of so-called tourism satellite accounts. At
the same time, the World Travel & Tourism
Council (WTTC), an association of leading
tourism companies, has described the economic impact of international tourism on the basis of...
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