1960s Rock Outline

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American Folk Music
Folk music has been in the heart of the nation for generations. Early artists appeared around the time of the Great Depression as the voice of the nation and a shoulder to lean on. The 1960s was also an era of change and unrest, and like the artists that came before them, 60s folk artists represented the outrage and spirit of the American people.

Early Influences:
-Woody Guthrie
oEarly 30s
oMost well known for the song, “This land is your land” which, recorded at the time of the Depression, was intended to lift the spirits of average Americans -Pete Seeger

Figures of the Early 1960s:
-Bob Dylan
oConsidered to be the most influential figure of the 1960s Folk movement oStarted his career playing in New York coffeehouses
oMany of his songs were politically motivated and reflected the cultural upheaval of the 1960s oSome of his most popular earlier works can be found on the album, “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” oIn response to the new music of the British Invasion and the Blues movement that had been occurring for years, he began to change his sound to fit the mood of the mid 1960s oInitiated the Folk-Rock movement when he experimented with electric guitars and sound on his album, “Bringing It All Back Home” oCredited for his literary talent in his songwriting

-Joan Baez
oInvolved in civil rights and nonviolence
oPlayed in coffeehouses in Boston
oGained considerable attention from the ’59 Newport Folk Festival oHad an off and on relationship with Bob Dylan while they toured together -Tim Buckley
-Leonard Cohen

British Invasion
The British Invasion was not an attack on American soil as it sounds, but it was however a takeover by British musicians on American pop culture. The sounds of nation reverberated across the Atlantic and reshaped the quiet folksy-blues oriented music of America and turned it into the noisy, angry, electric superpower it would become.

First Wave:
-The Beatles
oMembers were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr (former members include Stuart Sutcliffe, Andy White, and Pete Best) o Born in Liverpool, England
oBegan their career in Hamburg Germany playing in underground clubs oIn America
Appeared on the Ed Sullivan show and hit it off with American viewers •The Ed Sullivan show also hosted such names as The Dave Clark Five, The Kinks, and The Rolling Stones First American Tour was a huge success

oIn Britain
Debut single “Love Me Do” made it onto the UK charts Appearance on the UK television show, “Thank Your Lucky Stars” was viewed by six million people o“The Beatles might have been more talented and better-advertised than any group that came before, but their music was solidly in the rock 'n' roll/show tune/R & B tradition that was already universally received at this point”

oInfluence on Rock
Created a completely unique sound
Used new studio techniques and instruments
Reverberation, echoes, and reverse tape effects
Fair ground organ
Often referenced drugs in their music
The song, “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” describes many LSD induced fantasy scenes Deals with the “rebellious youth” of the time period, often associating with the hippie movement •Many young listeners could relate to the drug references

"Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. ... I don't know what will go first-Rock and Roll or Christianity. We're more popular than Jesus now. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It's them twisting

-The Rolling Stones
oConsisted of members Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and Ian Stewart oSounded much darker than the Beatles
Riot erupted during the song “Sympathy for the Devil” at a 1969 concert Opposed the Vietnam War
oMick Jagger said his goal was to change peoples’ way of thinking "We're moving after the minds and so are most of the new groups" “He saw the Stones...
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