1776 by David Mccullough

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Shamia Swanks
Professor Timothy Knight
US History 1301
21 September 2011
1776 by David McCullough
David McCullough wrote a revealing novel about the struggles and challenges America faced during the year of 1776 as the war for American independence commenced. “1776” shed light on the hardships the country faced in order for us to live the life of freedom we do today. The American army was composed of regular everyday people with a lack of military experience, but under the leadership of General George Washington America was victorious. They faced many adversities despite just the British powers. There were many loyalists and traitors that lived right at home pledging their loyalty to the British crown. Thanks to the determination of the American people they didn’t let those opposing forces deter them.

Overall, I truly enjoyed the book because it was a story of perseverance. Our ancestors who fought for this country put their faith and trust into a man with little experience and believed that he would lead the country to its independence. There were many times when Washington retreated or made major mistakes, yet the constant diligence of the American people was something I was astonished by. As the Americans faced constant losses, the victories at Trenton and Princeton were just what they needed to renew their hopes. “With the victory at Trenton came the realization that Americans had bested the enemy” (290). 1776 was an important year of American History; the pivotal moment when we were no longer the small thirteen colonies, but a nation of our own. McCullough did an excellent job in connecting us with the character. Washington “felt a great distress from a consciousness that [his] abilities and military experience may not be equal to the extensive and important trust” (49). We could feel the desperation of the soldiers as they fought to the end, not knowing if their efforts were worth it. I really liked how he used direct statements and letters to...
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