13 Colonies Report

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13 COLONIES REPORT
INTRODUCTION
This is a report about the 13 colonies. First I will be talking about all the 13 colonies. Then I will be talking about one specific colony, Virginia. When I talk about Virginia, I will tell you about their migration, reason for migration, Native Americans, and more. So get ready for a report about the 13 colonies. 13 COLONIES

There are 3 sets of England colonies with 13 colonies in them. The first colony is the New England colony which consists of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. The second colony is the middle colonies which consist of New York, Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The final colony is the southern colony which consists of Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. These colonies are located along the eastern coast next to the Atlantic Ocean.

VIRGINIA’S MIGRATION AND REASON FOR MIGRATION
Virginia's earliest European immigrants were English—only a few hundred at first, but 4,000 between 1619 and 1624, of whom fewer than 1,200 survived epidemics and Indian attacks. Despite such setbacks, Virginia's population increased, mostly by means of immigration, from about 5,000 in 1634 to more than 15,000 in 1642, including 300 blacks. Within 30 years, the population had risen to more than 40,000, including 2,000 blacks. In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, immigrants came not only from England but also from Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Poland. In 1701, about 500 French Huguenots fled Catholic France to settle near the present site of Richmond, and beginning in 1714, many Germans and Scotch-Irish moved from Pennsylvania into the Valley of Virginia.

VIRGINIA’S CLOTHING
The clothing illustrated in this article was worn by living people who had much in common with us. Not only did people then respond to fashion, they also varied their garments based on the activity and the formality of the occasion. The eighteenth-century...
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