A Strategic Logic for Arts Marketing

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This article was downloaded by: [University of Bristol] On: 24 November 2012, At: 07:48 Publisher: Routledge Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

International Journal of Cultural Policy
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A STRATEGIC LOGIC FOR ARTS MARKETING
Miranda Boorsma
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Department of Arts, Culture & Media Studies, University of Groningen, PO Box 716, 9700 AS Groningen, The Netherlands Phone: +31 50 363 5962 E-mail: Version of record first published: 15 Aug 2006.

To cite this article: Miranda Boorsma (2006): A STRATEGIC LOGIC FOR ARTS MARKETING, International Journal of Cultural Policy, 12:1, 73-92 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10286630600613333

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A STRATEGIC LOGIC FOR ARTS MARKETING Integrating customer value and artistic objectives Miranda Boorsma
m.a.boorsma@rug.nl Boorsma Francis of Miranda Francis 2006 &Article Ltd Cultural Policy 0 100000and print/1477-2833 online 12 Original 1028-6632 International Journal 10.1080/10286630600613333 GCUL_A_161315.sgm Taylor

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Recent thinking within arts philosophy has moved further and further away from the concept of autonomous art. Nowadays art is mostly seen as an intrinsic part of everyday human life. Artistic value is conceived of more and more as something that depends largely upon experiencing the works as they are encountered within general culture. This relational perspective on art has important implications for the future development of arts marketing as a discipline. This article argues that arts marketing should primarily aim to support and reinforce the artistic functioning of artworks. It proposes that art consumers should be seen as co-producers in the total art process and advocates that arts marketing should focus on the artistic experience as the core customer value. KEYWORDS arts marketing; exchange; customer value; artistic experience; co-creation of value

Introduction
Since the 1980s, arts marketing practice has undergone rapid professionalization. Today’s arts managers are well informed about current marketing theory and acknowledge its strategic importance for the arts. Many of them have acquired their marketing knowledge by studying standard marketing textbooks as well as specialized publications on arts marketing and by following courses (Boorsma 1998). The proliferation of arts marketing has been accompanied by an increasing number of academic publications. Quite a few books have been published on this subject (e.g. Mokwa et al. 1980; Kotler & Scheff 1997; Boorsma 1998; Kotler & Kotler 1998; Kolb 2000; Colbert et al. 2001; Klein 2001) and an increasing number of articles are being published in leading journals (Rentschler 2002). Rentschler’s examination of these publications shows that the focus during the past decades has evolved from marketing as a functional tool to a focus on marketing as a...
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