what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change the American society

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To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change the American society? In your answer, be sure to address the political, social and economic effects of the Revolution in the period from 1775 to 1800.

A. 1779 Patriot Woman
B. 1779 Penn. No Tory, no tyranny, and perpetual banishment of the crown C. 1783 peace with Britain+ nationalism
D. 1786, Statues at Large of Virginia: everyone has the right to profess and support his religious worship E. 1786, United Indian Nations, Speech at the Confederate Council: disappointed, not included in the peace, Americans neglected our plan of having a general conference with the diffenret nations of the confederacy F. 1786, Medal of the Philadelphia Society for the Promotion of Agriculture ”venerate the plough” G. 1787,Letter from Abigail Adams to Thomas Jefferson: tumults in her native state, very serious condition, “they hace been carried to so alarming a height as to stop the courts f justice in several counties. Abigail considered those who had cried for a paper currency or an equal distribution of property people “without conscience ot principles” and :under pretense of grievances which have no existence but in their imaginations”. H. Laws about fugitive slaves and indentured servants

I. 1788, James Madison “The Federalist”: Government: govern the people; govern itself J. Women’s rights

Political: BCEI
Social: ADGHJ
Economic:FG

Long since the American Revolution had taken place, the American society was thoroughly influenced in different aspects, mainly politically, socially and economically. Nearly every aspect of American life was somehow touched by the revolutionary spirit. From slavery to women’s rights, from religious life to political life, American attitudes were forever changed.

The most apparent influence of the American Revolution is that it caused the relationship between Britain and American forever broken. The theory of nationalism thus emerged as a result in every American’s...