The Montgomery Bus Boycott Key Features

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December 1st 1955

Black African American citizen, Rosa Parks is arrested for refusing to give up her seat when the bus was filling up. She was allegedly arrested for violating bus segregation laws and behaving in disorderly conduct.

1955

The Montgomery Bus Boycott

April 23th 1956
The Montgomery bus company decides to implement a policy of desegregation after the U. S. Supreme Court dismisses the appeal of a federal appeals court ruling outlawing bus segregation in South Carolina.

March 19th 1956

King is found guilty of violating the boycott conspiracy law and is sentenced to a $500 fine.

February 13th 1956

A grand jury investigation is ordered by the Montgomery circuit judge to see whether the bus boycott violates a state boycott conspiracy law.

December 13th 1955

MIA begins to operate a car pool system.

December 8th 1955

A proposal about a bus seating policy that is fairer towards black people, but still segregated is made by the MIA spokesperson to the city and bus company officials ends in a deadlock.

December 5th 1955

Rosa Parks is convicted and fined by the city court. A one-day boycott of the city buses has 90% of regular black riders staying off the buses. Martin Luther King Jr. is elected the president of the newly formed Montgomery Improvement Association. First MIA meeting is held at the Holt Street Baptist Church, where the several thousand black citizens who attend support the continuing of the bus boycott.

December 21th 1956

Black citizens desegregate Montgomery buses after the 13-month boycott. The bus company resumes full service.

November 14th 1956

By a unanimous vote, the bus boycott is voted to be ended at the next MIA meeting.

April 24th 1956

Bus companies in more than a dozen Southern cities stop...
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