The Israel Palestine Conflict

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Slide 1:- THE ISRAEL PALESTINE CONFLICT

Slide2:- PALESTINE 1850’S

Slide 3:- 1880’S EUROPE
Anti-Semitism
Pogrom
Over 200,000 Jews were murdered in state organise Russian pogroms. Jewish figures came to a conclusion that without a state of their own Jews Would always be persecuted.

Slide 4:- MIGRATION
Theodor Herzl was the founder of modern Zionism. He advocated mass Jewish immigration to Palestine. From 1882 onwards mostly eastern European Jews seeking a new life began arriving in Palestine. The first arrivals quite often mixed with the Palestinians, after 1900 they increasingly self-segregated. Around 60,000 arrived between 1882 and 1914.

Slide 5:- THE BALFOUR DECLARATION
British to get the support of the Jews in the WW1 have declared the acceptance of creating the Jews state in the Palestine without consulting with the existing Palestine’s

Slide 6:- BRITISH-PALESTINE
In 1917 Britain, at the height of World War One, agreed for its own imperial reasons agreed to sponsor the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine Palestinians were not consulted
After Britain took control of Palestine in 1918 a whole new wave of Zionist immigration began. These new immigrants sought to have as little to do as possible with the Palestinian population – boycotting their produce, culture and economy. Instead these immigrants with British support set up their own exclusive institutions, used their own language and generally ignored the fact that another people was already living in Palestine * A key element of their settlement was the idea of “the conquest of labour” whereby they would “redeem the land” by establishing modern farming communities. In this way they hoped to become “a light unto the nations.” Violence

Palestinians demanded representative self-government but Britain ignored their calls. Tensions between the Palestinians and the new immigrants rose throughout the 1920s and 30s as Palestinians feared for their future. Violence broke out in 1920, 1921 and 1929. The worst single incident was the murder of 67 Jews in Hebron in 1929. Slide 7:- THE NAZIS EFFECT

In 1933 the Nazis came to power in Germany.
Immigration exploded as Jews sought to escape Europe. Between 1933 and 1936 140,000 new immigrants arrived. The Palestinians believed they were being swamped.
Slide 8:- THE ARAB REVOLT
In April 1936 the Palestinians rebelled. Their demands were representative government leading to independence and an end to unlimited immigration. The revolt continued until 1939 before the British eventually managed to crush it. Around 5,000 Palestinians were killed.

Strength|
25,000 to 50,000 British soldiers
20,000 Jewish policemen, supernumeraries and settlement guards 15,000 Haganah fighters
2,883 Palestine Police Force, all ranks (1936)
2,000 Irgun militants| 1,000 – 3,000 in 1936–37
between 2,500 and 7,500 in 1938
(plus an additional 6,000 to 15,000 part-timers)|
Casualties and losses|
British Security Forces:
262 killed
c. 550 wounded
Jews:
c. 300 killed
4 executed| Arabs:
c. 5,000 killed
c. 15,000 wounded
108 executed
12,622 detained
5 exiled|

Slide 9:- ZIONIST VIOLENCE
A number of Jewish paramilitary groups also became active during the Arab Revolt – these were the Stern Gang, the Irgun and the Haganah. Ostensibly these groups sought to protect the Jewish settlements but they also engaged in terrorism – the speciality of the Irgun being the placing of bombs in Arab marketplaces for maximum casualties. Ze’ev Jabotinsky, an influential leader amongst these groups was under no illusion about the need to use violence: “Every indigenous people will resist alien settlers as long as they see any hope of ridding themselves of the danger of foreign settlement… We must either suspend our settlement efforts or continue them without paying attention to the mood of the natives. Settlement can thus develop under the protection of a...
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