Summaries Is Fast Food the New Tobacco

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Is Fast Food the New Tobacco:

Six Summaries of Some Related Literature

In David Zinczenko’s article “Don’t Blame the Eater,” first published on November 23, 2002 in the New York Times: Zinczenko argues that children have no other affordable choice to fast food which leads to health problems and health cost. Specifically, Zinczenko came from a split home, dad went his way and mom worked long hours, lunch and diner was a choice of numerous fast food restaurants where the affordable option. The author joined the Navy Reserves used a health magazine to learn to manage his diet. Zinczenko’s view is most won’t turn their lives around as he did and will have a lifetime of obesity. He elaborates the problem is just not the obese but all of ours.

Later in the article he compares money spent treating diabetes over a time span and the general cause of diabetes over a time span. With 2.6 billion spent in 1969 for diabetes and today 100 billion a year. Before 1994 mostly a genetic disorder caused diabetes in children with 5 percent obesity related and today 30 percent are obesity related.

The author states that some would argue we should know better than to eat two fast food meals a day. He argues back where are they supposed to find alternatives. Using the comparison of a McDonald’s on every block, but try to find a grapefruit on the same block. Zinczenko also compares labeling laws on grocery items and warnings on tobacco to the lack of labeling and warning on prepared food. For example a supposed 150 calorie meal list on a fast food company’s Web site after the trimmings is really 1,040 calorie meal.

As David Zinczenko himself put it, “ Make fun if you will of these kids launching lawsuits against the fast food industry, but don’t be surprised if you’re the next plaintiff. As with the tobacco industry, it may be only a matter of time before state governments begin to see a direct line between the $1 billion that McDonald’s and Burger King spend each year on advertising and their own swelling health care cost.” (393) of They Say / I Say the Moves that Matter in Academic Writing with Readings Second Edition.

According to the author the fast food industry marketing is vulnerable and should protect itself and customers with nutrition information. He goes on to warn of more sick, obese kids, and litigations to follow.

Is Fast Food the New Tobacco:

Six Summaries of Some Related Literature

In Radley Balko’s essay “What You Eat Is Your Business,” first published on May 23, 2004 on Cato.org, a site sponsored by the Cato Institute: Balko argues that obesity is personal responsibility , not a public healthcare issue. Balko points out media bias, nutrition activists, and policy makers are pushing for the socialization of medicine. Specifically, Balko believes in limited government, individual liberty, free markets and peace. With individual ownership of your health and well-being responsibility belonging to the individual. He elaborates that government anti-obesity initiatives, prohibiting some foods, federal funding for bike paths and sidewalks, demanding labels on food, and restricting food marketing are bring government between you and your waistline.

Later in the essay he point’s out anti-obesity measures costing the public money. To include 200 million earmarked by the federal government. The proposal of a fat tax by two senator’s and menu labeling legislation. That by labeling obesity as a collective problem with collective ownership it leads to more federal restrictions on the consumers civil liberties.

The author states this is the wrong way to fight obesity. Instead of intervention a sense of responsibility and ownership should be encouraged to fight obesity. He warns that we are moving towards a socialist health care system, where your health is a matter of public health instead of a matter of personal responsibility. This system will require some...
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