Soctec2 Power Relations

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SOCTEC
 2 Science,
 Technology
 and
 Society
 2 Master
 Lecture:
 Dr.
 Robert
 Javier,
 Department
 of
 Psychology,
 W602
 D LSU-­‐M Key
 Concept
 Points
 for
 Understanding: Topic
 3:
 
 Science,
 Technology
 and
 the
 Human
 Person
 and
 Communities:
  Impacts
 of
 Science
 and
 Technology
 to
 the
 Human
 Personhood,
  Social
 Institutions
 and
 Practices
 and
 Power
 relations Power
 and
 power
 relations
 in
 society o Power
 could
 be
 defined
 as
 the
 capacity
 to
 do
 something.
 
 A
 person
 has
 power
  when
 s/he
 can
 achieve
 something,
 and
 that
 something
 could
 either
 be
 bad
 or
  good,
 right
 or
 wrong.
 
 All
 persons
 have
 potential
 power,
 in
 that
 all
 have
 the
  capacity
 to
 do/achieve
 something. A
 person
 can
 convert
 potential
 power
 into
 actual
 power,
 and
 this
 is
 a
 function
 of
  the
 context
 within
 which
 such
 person
 exists. Such
 context
 could
 be
 characterized
 by
 variables
 within
 which
 the
 person
 is
  differentiated
 and
 acquires
 his/her
 identity.
 
 Some
 of
 these
 variables
 are
 those
  in
 which
 the
 person
 is
 born
 into
 (ascribe),
 and
 others
 are
 those
 in
 which
 the
  person
 become
 through
 social
 processes
 of
 learning
 and
 achieving
 (acquired).
 
  These
 variables
 influence
 people’s
 capacity
 to
 convert
 potential
 power
 into
  actual
 power,
 and
 become
 basis
 for
 the
 emergence
 of
 power
 differentials. Class,
 gender
 and
 ethnicity/race
 are
 some
 of
 these
 variables.
 
 Rich
 people
 have
  more
 power
 than
 the
 poor;
 men
 may
 posses
 more
 power
 than
 women;
 and
  dominant
 racial/ethnic
 groups
 may
 posses
 more
 power
 than
 those
 who
 are
 in
  the
 minority. People
 are
 born
 to
 become
 part
 of
 a
 community
 and
 a
 larger
 society.
 Groups
  exist
 within
 these
 communities
 and
 societies.
 Each
 group
 possesses
 a
 set
 of
  characteristics
 and
 interests
 which
 are
 common
 to
 each
 member,
 but
 are
  distinct
 from
 other
 groups.
 Like
 individuals,
 a
 particular
 group
 also
 possesses
  power,
 which
 is
 expressed
 as
 its
 capacity
 to
 do
 something.
 Such
 power
  emanates
 from
 the
 nature
 of
 its
 members. Individuals
 and
 groups
 in
 a
 community
 or
 society
 interact
 with
 each
 other
  through
 a
 complex
 and
 intricate
 web
 of
 social
 power
 relations.
 Here,
 it
 is
 always
  possible
 that
 conflict
 emerge
 since
 common
 grounds
 are
 contested.
 These
  could
 come
 in
 the
 form
 of
 conflicts
 emanating
 from
 certain
 forms
 of
  entitlements
 over
 which
 individuals
 and
 groups
 compete—such
 as
 access
 to
  benefits,
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