Safety and Health in Production Line

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Table of Contents
1.LEGAL REQUIREMENTS ON THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT2
2.PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)3
3.FIRST AID KITS7
4.SAFETY OF MOVING MACHINERY14
5.FIRE FIGHTING AND FIRE RISK20

1. LEGAL REQUIREMENTS ON THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT

Legal requirements are any requirements that are issued by the local, provincial or federal government and are within scope. The principal legal requirements relating to occupational health and safety are covered in the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974 (HSWA) and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974 (HSWA)

This act implemented the majority of the proposal of the Robens Report. More exactly: i. It established the Health and Safety Commission (HSC). ii. It established the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). iii. It conferred accident prevention powers on HSE inspectors. iv. It placed broad general duties on employers, employees and manufacturers of industrial products as well as on the self-employed and occupiers of buildings where people work. v. It provided for participation of management and workers in the identification and monitoring of workplace hazards by requiring the appointment of union safety representatives from the workforce to carry out periodic inspections of the workplace, and by requiring that changes and improvements in occupational health and safety by discussed in meetings of safety committees consisting of management and union representation. These requirements were laid down in the Safety Representatives and Safety Committees Regulations 1977 (SRSCR).

Duties of designers, manufacturers and suppliers of industrial products

HSWA, sec 6, requires that, so far as is reasonably practicable, designers, manufacturers (including submanufacturers), importers and suppliers of articles and substances for use at work: i. Ensure that they are designed and constructed so as to be safe and without health risk (HSWA, sec 6(1)(a), (2) and (4)); ii. Carry out or arrange for the carrying out of testing, research and examination which may be necessary to comply with the duty in section 6(1)(a) (HSWA, sec 6(1)(b) and (5)); iii. Take steps which are necessary to secure that adequate information is available about the use for which the product has been designed and tested, and about any conditions necessary to ensure that, when put to that use, the product will be safe and without health risks (HSWA, sec 6(1)(c) and (4)(c)).

Special responsibilities of designers and manufacturers

The duty to research and test industrial products rests with designers and manufacturers. The requirements applicable to importers, distributors and suppliers of industrial products are rather less onerous. It is their duty to obtain information, on an ongoing basis, from designers and manufacturers, so as to be able to advise their client-users how to use safely products which they buy or hire. Provision of data sheets by designers and manufacturers is not necessarily enough for these purposes. Importers and suppliers are not required to repeat any research and testing already carried out (HSWA, sec 6(6)).

2. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
Personal protective equipment (PPE) refers to protective clothing, helmets, goggles, or other garment designed to protect the wearer's body or clothing from injury by blunt impacts, electrical hazards, heat, chemicals, and infection, for job-related occupational safety and health purposes.

* Safety boot

The safety boot basically is used to protect feet and legs from hazards. The hazards that will cause injury to our legs are wet, electrostatic build-up, slipping, cuts and punctures, falling objects, metal and chemical splash, abrasion. * Safety helmet

The safety helmet used to protect head form injury if accident happens when working at sites

* Goggles

The goggles are available for use in all...
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