Rudolf Dreikurs's Reasons for Student Misbehavior Require Thoughtful Responses

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Reasons for Student Misbehavior Require Thoughtful Responses source: http://www.advantagepress.com/newsletters/jun03news.asp

Many educators believe that students misbehave to achieve self-serving goals. These usually include: getting attention, seeking power, taking revenge and avoiding failure. When we look carefully at the misbehavior we can usually find that the reason lies in one of these four goals. Dr. Rudolf Dreikurs, renowned educator, developed these four behavioral goals in the 1930s. He was a student and colleague of Alfred Adler, who believed that "all behavior has a purpose." Dreikurs has written many articles and books on student behavior and much of his work can be purchased on the internet. His theories on behavior have had an enormous impact on the raising of children and classroom management models. A summary of Dreikurs' four behavioral goals follow:

* Attention
Some students strive to be the center of attention. They do almost anything to be noticed from being argumentative to being funny. There is a lack of concern about following accepted procedure to gain recognition. Teachers and classmates find behavior by this student annoying and at times rude and unacceptable. The attention seekers may be disciplined for: disrespect, teasing, disturbing the class, being uncooperative, swearing, talking, being out of his seat, and making fun of others. Dreikurs said most students start misbehaving by seeking attention, and when this fails, they move on to more problematic goal-seeking behaviors, such as power. This is why it is important to find a thoughtful intervention in the first phase of misbehavior: attention seeking. Dreikurs believed that over 90% of all misbehavior is for attention. At the Interventions Central website, you can read some thoughts about how to break out of the attention cycle by using "random positive attention" with students. * Power

Wanting to be in charge or in control provides the motivation for some...
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