Role of Trade Unions in National and International Context

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Human Resource Management

ROLE OF TRADE UNIONS IN NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT

Table of Contents
I.Introduction1
II.Historical Development of Trade Union1
III.History of Trade Union in India2
1.Trade Union in India: Formation of First Union Association2
2.Trade Union in India: Formation of the First Trade Union3 IV.Phases of Trade Union in India3
1.First phase:3
2.Second phase:3
3.Third phase:3
4.Fourth phase:3
V.Trade Unions and Related Legislation in India4
1.The Trade Unions Act, 19264
2.Registration of Trade Unions4
3.Application for Registration4
VI.Functions of Trade Unions4
VII.Objectives of Trade Unions5
VIII.Reasons for Workers to Join Trade Unions5
IX.Issues6
1.Unionization and employment6
2.Wages and working conditions6
3.Industrial conflict6
4.Labour management relations7
5.Changing public perception of trade unions7
X.Future role of Trade Unions Internationally7
XI.Future role of Trade Unions in India8
XII.Trade Unions Failure in India- Maruti Manesar9
XIII.Trade Unions Failure in Turkey- 2008 crisis9
XIV.Conclusion10
XV.Bibliography11

I.
II. Introduction
Just 1 per cent of the world’s population owns 40 per cent of the world’s wealth, while 60 per cent have to share just 1.9 per cent of it. Most workers have no employment security and billions earn less than a dollar a day. The pursuit of profit trumps the health of people and the future of the planet. Economic growth does not translate into common prosperity. Billions of workers have no say in their working conditions; many are threatened, intimidated, fired and in the worst cases thrown into prison or killed by hired gunmen when they demand their basic human rights of freedom of association, collective bargaining and industrial democracy.

Those who profit from this world disorder tell us that these are the inevitable side-effects of market dynamism, which in turn is the most effective mechanism to create growth and wealth. It would just be too depressing to imagine that this were true and that humankind could not improve on such a world. Change is necessary – indeed, it is inevitable, as the current system is unsustainable; but it remains difficult, as vested interests constitute a huge and dangerous obstacle on the path to more equitable solutions.

The history of trade unions is a history of struggles for greater social justice and against dictatorship, both in societies and at the workplace. Often accused by their opponents of being unreasonable, unable to understand economics, and dinosaurs of the industrial past, there can be no doubt in retrospect that in most battles trade unions have been on the right side of history. While business has unhesitatingly engaged with dictatorships around the world in its pursuit of profit, trade unions were and are at the forefront of bringing about democratic change in countries from South Africa, Brazil and the Republic of Korea to Poland and most recently Egypt. The right to strike, a minimum wage, the eight-hour working day, paid vacations, social security – all are milestones in the long struggle of trade unions for social justice. III. Historical Development of Trade Union

As an organized movement, trade unionism originated in the 19th century in Great Britain, continental Europe, and the United States. In many countries it is synonymous with the term labour movement. Smaller associations of workers started appearing in Britain in the 18th century, but they remained sporadic and short-lived through most of the 19th century, in part because of the hostility they encountered from employers and government groups that resented this new form of political and economic activism. At that time unions and unionists were regularly prosecuted under various restraint-of-trade and conspiracy statutes in both Britain and the United States. While union organizers in both countries...
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