Reflection: Back to the Future

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REYNALDO C. NICDAO, MM
Doctor of Philosophy in Education - UA Graduate School
Curriculum Development and Program Evaluation, 2nd Semester, 2012-2013 Arnel T. Sicat, PhD. – Professor

REFLECTION: Back to the Future by Jesus C. Palma, Ed.D.

I absolutely concur that present-day education is irrelevant because of the continual use of a “sabertooth” or antiquated curriculum in a cybernetic age.
Eminent historian Dr. Ambeth Ocampo revealed that we still confront the basic problems identified in a 1925 report of the Monroe Commission on Philippine Education. We can look at the Monroe Report in two ways. One approach is to praise the Commission for its foresight, because like clairvoyants they were able to see our present problems many years ago. The other manner to interpret the report is to accept the sad fact that Philippine education has not changed very much since 1925.

It is a time-honored reality that education has always held out hope for the future because it creates an idea or illusion that it is a means for upward mobility. Education provides the means to go up the social and economic ladder based on merit and achievement, it is seen as a means to break the status quo and it tells us that things do not have to be the way they are.

The indispensable role of education was encapsulated by Kim Jones, CEO of Curriki, who affirmed that “No matter what global problem you are dreading, whether it’s the elimination of poverty, whether it’s the creation of peace, whether its solving environmental energy problems, the solution always include education, never is it without an education component and sometimes cannot be done without education.”

Nonetheless, even with the indisputable conviction in the importance of educating Filipinos, current performance indicators show a dismal picture of the quality of education in the country. Participation rates have worsened, dropout rates remain high, graduates of high school are inadequately prepared for the...
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