Realism

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 48
  • Published : April 8, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
International Relations 2: Notes

David Wessels

国際関係論2:ノート

デヴィッド・ウェッセルズ

Copyright © 2009 by David Wessels
© 禁無断転載
David Wessels
Sophia University
7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 102-8554
Japan
〒102-8554

東京都千代田区紀尾井町 7-1 上智大学

http://www.sophia.ac.jp

International Relations 2: Notes

David Wessels

国際関係論2:ノート

デヴィッド・ウェッセルズ

2009

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 2
Table of Contents
For Further Reading

2E

Chapter 1

Introduction

3E

Chapter 2

In Search of Theory

4E

Chapter 3

Realism

6E

Chapter 4

Peacekeeping Operations

8E

Chapter 5

Pluralism

10 E

Chapter 6

The Idea of Human Rights

12 E

Chapter 7

Globalism

14 E

Chapter 8

The Movement of People

16 E

and International Relations
Chapter 9

Globalization: Light and Shadow

18 E

Chapter 10

Governance

20 E

Chapter 11

An Axis for Theory: Cooperation and Conflict 22 E

Chapter 12

A Human Image of International Relations

Chapter 13

Constructivism

1E

24 E
26 E

For Further Reading
*Paul R. Viotti and Mark V. Kauppi, International Relations Theory: Realism, Pluralism, Globalism, 2nd ed. (New York: Macmillan, 1993) *Robert O. Keohane and Joseph S. Nye, Power and Interdependence, 3rd ed. (New York: Longman, 2001)

Sheldon Anderson, et al., International Studies: An
Interdisciplinary Approach to Global Issues (Westview Press, 2008)
Edward Keene, International Political Thought (Polity Press, 2005) Eric O. Hanson, Religion and Politics in the International System Today (Cambridge University Press, 2006)

2E

International Relations 2
Chapter 1

Introduction
1. The notes in the following chapters are meant as lecture notes for the second term of an introductory course in International Relations at the university level.

They follow on a previously

distributed set of notes entitled “International Relations 1: Notes,” by the same author.
2. The first term’s focus was on the history and concepts that are the basis of the study of international relations today.

These

building blocks of contemporary theory are the foundation for the survey of theories and approaches that is found in these pages. These notes are not an exhaustive report on all current theories, but a guide to the approaches that theorists of international relations today take to their field.

3.

The

categories

“realism,”

“pluralism,”

and

“globalism”

correspond to the three “images” that Paul Viotti and Mark Kauppi used in the first, second, and third editions of their textbook International Relations Theory: Realism, Pluralism, Globalism (the third edition added the words “and Beyond” to the title). They have a pedagogical purpose: to provide a suitable framework in an introductory course for explaining the diverse and complex theories of

scholars.

Empirical

cases

are

used

to

illustrate

these

categories.
4. At the beginning of the 21st century, there is widespread use of concepts and ideas about international relations theory that do not fit easily into the standard categories. Some of these--for example, globalization and governance--are also introduced in a manner suitable for this course.

5. This second term course, therefore, moves from general concepts to the theories that employ those concepts and to new ideas that are being used to understand the changing patterns of global politics and international relations.

3E

International Relations 2
Chapter 2

In Search of Theory
1. International relations is the object of our study, whereas the field (or discipline) of international relations (also known as “international relations theory” or “I.R.”) is what we know about that object through our ideas and intellect.

*The history of thought provides clues for our study.
*We can find out what we need to study by considering what
people throughout the world are interested in.
*A broad (or general)...
tracking img