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ENGLISH LANGUAGE & GENERAL KNOWLEDGE (General)
BCSE/2010 Page 1 of 9
ROYAL CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
BHUTAN CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION (BCSE) 2010
EXAMINATION CATEGORY: GENERAL
PAPER II: ENGLISH LANGUAGE & GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
Date : 23 November 2010
Total Marks : 100
Examination Time : 3 hours
Reading Time : 15 Minutes (Prior to examination time)
GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS
• This paper is divided into two parts – Part I and Part II. Part I has two sections – A: Case Study and B: Topical Discussion. Part II also has two sections – C: Subjective Questions and D: Objective Questions (Multiple Choice).

• Specific instructions are provided for each section separately. Please read the instructions for each section carefully and answer the questions that follow. • Section A under Part I and Section D under Part II are compulsory. • For Section D under Part II (Multiple Choice Items), you are required to write your responses on the Answer Sheet provided.

• The intended marks for each question are given in brackets. • Please begin each section on a fresh page.
• This booklet contains 9 pages (including this cover page). ENGLISH LANGUAGE & GENERAL KNOWLEDGE (General)
BCSE/2010 Page 2 of 9
PAPER II: ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
This paper is divided into two parts – Part I and Part II. Part I has two sections – A and B. Part II also has two sections – C and D. Please read the instructions for each section carefully and answer the questions that follow.

PART I
__________________________________________
Section ‘A’ is a Case Study, while Section ‘B’ is a Topical Discussion. Please follow the instructions under each section.
SECTION A: Case Study (40 Marks)
Read the following passage and answer ALL FOUR questions that follow. The Loss of Privacy
The first thing that the globalization of communication through the Internet threatened was the notion of boundaries – a notion as old as the human race, in fact as old as the animal kingdom. Ethology teaches us that every animal recognizes around itself, and its fellows, a bubble of respect, a territorial area within which it feels safe, and that it will see as an adversary whoever steps over that boundary. Social anthropology has shown us how this protective bubble varies according to cultures. In certain cultures, for example, the closeness of another person is an expression of familiarity; in others it is seen as intrusive and aggressive. On the human level, this area of protection was extended from the individual to the community. The boundary – of the city, region, realm – has always been viewed as a kind of collective enlargement of the individual bubble of protection. We need only think of how obsessed the Latin mentality was with boundaries, so much so that Rome’s own foundation myth centers on a territorial violation: Romulus traced a boundary and killed his brother because his brother did not respect it. In crossing the Rubicon, Julius Caesar felt the same distress that perhaps seized Remus before he violated the boundary marked by his brother. Caesar knew that by crossing that river he was invading Roman territory under arms. That he later established a bridgehead in Rimini and marched on Rome is irrelevant: the sacrilege occurs when you cross the boundary, and it is irreversible. The die is cast. The Greeks knew the boundary of the polis, and the boundary was marked by the use of the language – or by its various dialects. The barbarians began where people no longer spoke Greek.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE & GENERAL KNOWLEDGE (General)
BCSE/2010 Page 3 of 9
Sometimes the notion of (political) boundaries has been so obsessive as to result in the construction of a wall inside the city itself, to establish who must stay on one side and who on the other. Stepping over an inner-city boundary exposed East Germans to the same punishment inflicted on the legendary Remus. The example of East Berlin tells us something that concerns every boundary: a boundary protects a community...
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