Physics Lab

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Ticker-Tape Timer: Finding “g”
Tricia Mangan, Annie O’Brien, Abby Alexander, Allison Stenko Interpretations:
1. The time required for the objects with different masses to fall equal distances was equal. 2. The average speed of the two different masses was quite similar, within one tenth of a second of each other. 3. Yes, because physics theory says that objects free falling, where the only force acting on them is gravity, accelerate at the same rate no matter what their mass is. 4. The change in spacing of the dots tells us that the speed of the object is increased as it falls, because the spacing increases between the dots. Sample Calculations:

9.) 60 dots per second, 24 dots 24 dots ÷60 dots per second=.400 seconds t=.400 s
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11.) 50 gram= dt=v-bar, d=-.792 m ÷ t=.400 s = -1.98 m/s v-bar=-1.98m/s
100 gram= dt=v-bar, d=-.783 m ÷ t= .400 s = -1.96 m/s v-bar=-1.96 m/s
12.) 50 gram= ∆vt=a v-bar=vf-vi , v-bar=-1.98m/s vi=0 m/s 2(-1.98m/s)=vf vf=-3.96m/s ∆v=-3.96 a=-3.96 m/s ÷ 0.400 sa=-9.90 m/s2
100 gram= ∆vt=a v-bar=vf-vi , v-bar=-1.96m/s vi=0 m/s 2(-1.96m/s)=vf vf=-3.92m/s ∆v=-3.96 a=-3.92 m/s ÷ 0.400 sa=-9.80 m/s2

Error Analysis:
9.81-9.859.81× 100= 0.408%
1. The exact distant from the ground to where the weight is dropped isn’t known. 2. The weight falling off the ticker tape could have prevented us from knowing when it hit the ground exactly. 3. When counting the dots we could have missed counted the dots because they were small and faint. Conclusion:

The acceleration of the 50 g rate weight was .10 greater than the weight of the 100 g weight; however, this is attributed to our sources of error. Therefore, we concluded that mass does not affect the acceleration due to gravity.
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