Odyssey Book 3 and 4 Reflection

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Early on in book 3 Homer shows us development in Telemachus’ character when Athena says “Telemachus, no more shyness, this is not the time!” while she is convincing him to Nestor about his father. Telemachus is becoming more of a man as this story progresses; who is going from a “wants what’s best, but doesn’t know how to get it” type of person to a “wants what’s best, does what’s best, and get’s what’s best” type of person. I think Homer is showing us the great influence the gods have over the mortals, even when the mortals don’t know they are influencing them since Athena is able to influence Telemachus even though she had not yet reveled herself as a goddess. Homer also shows us that the kings are people to and not just egotistical careless rulers. Homer shows this in instances not of only Odysseus by also of Nestor. Nestor invites Telemachus and Athena to join in on their meal and prayer and sacrifice to the god Poseidon. Nestor also sent his son Pisistratus to accompany Telemachus and Athena on the travels. The hospitality of kings continues in book 4 when king Menelaus invites Telemachus and Pisistratus to eat with him in his palace. The aid-in-arms of Menelaus acknowledged the looks of Telemachus and Pisistratus saying “… Two men, but the look like kin of mighty Zeus himself.” This shows us again that having good looks is seen as a gift from the gods to the good people. Also something the stood out to me was that homer often referred to Menelaus as “The red-haired king,” I’m sure if it’s significant in some way but it seemed odd to me.
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