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Neo Human Relations

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  • June 2012
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Human Relations Movement refers to those researchers of organizational development who study the behavior of people in groups, in particular workplace groups. It originated in the 1930s' Hawthorne studies, which examined the effects of social relations, motivation and employee satisfaction on factory productivity.

The Neo-Human Relations School focuses on the structures of modern organizations. It gave rise to several famous theories, including Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, which suggests that workers are motivated to satisfy basic needs at five levels: physiological, safety, love, esteem and self-actualization. This school of thought also includes Theory X and Theory Y.

Main contributors: MASLOW, HERZBERG AND McGREGOR.
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Abraham Maslow (1908 – 1970) along with Frederick Herzberg (1923-) introduced the Neo-Human Relations School in the 1950’s, which focused on the psychological needs of employees.

A business should therefore offer different incentives to workers in order to help them fulfill each need in turn and progress up the hierarchy. Managers should also recognise that workers are not all motivated in the same way and do not all move up the hierarchy at the same pace. They may therefore have to offer a slightly different set of incentives from worker to worker. -----------

This essay will discuss and elucidate to what extent the Neo- Humans Relations Approach had an impact to the design and management of people according to the principles of scientific management with reference to the Japanese approach.

Neo Humans Relations Approach was the reaction to the harshness of the scientific management which alienated the social needs of the workers. According to Thompson and McHugh (46:2002) Neo Human Relations was the reaction to the scientific management that of Taylorism that highly disregarded the human factor in the production processes.

Before the efficacy of the Neo Human Relations approach the Fordism was the centre...

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