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|PROFESSIONAL STUDIES |

| | |ORGANISING PUPILS FOR LEARNING |

| | |Objectives | | | |By the end of this topic, you should have achieved an understanding of the following issues relating to pupil grouping. You should: | | | |be familiar with the most common ways pupils are organised and grouped for learning in secondary schools; | | | |know the general trends illustrating the way grouping methods are used in secondary schools; | | | |understand the rationales of and influences on the choice of different grouping methods; | | | |have evaluated the evidence for the effectiveness of different grouping methods on academic achievement, attitudes to school and | |learning and on pupils’ opportunities; | | | |have understood the implications of different grouping strategies for the classroom teacher; | | | |have clarified your own perspectives on different pupil grouping methods. |

ORGANISATION OF PUPILS FOR LEARNING

OUTLINE OF LECTURE

1.Introduction - what is all the fuss about?
- methods of organising and grouping pupils

2.The current pattern of pupil grouping
-analysis of grouping methods currently used in schools -a mixture of methods - clarity or confusion?
-the shift in grouping from Y7 to Y10
-subject preferences in organising pupils

3.Influences on the pattern of pupil grouping
-political pressures - raising standards and ‘accountability’ -emphasis on academic curriculum - the impact of the National Curriculum
-cognitive development theory
-‘common sense’
-perpetuation by the powerful

4.The debate
• Key issues:
- in search of academic excellence
-pupil entitlement and equal opportunities
-class management
-motivation and class control

• Homogeneous grouping methods
the arguments for:
-advantages for the pupils
- working with peers
- a suitable (relevant) curriculum
-advantages for the teachers

the arguments against:
-inequality and the social divide
-...
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