Lit2020 Midterm Review Guide

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- Read every single story
- go over all notes on blackboard
- no questions on “regionalism” on test
- Don’t look at “real thing” discussion questions
- know 3 waves of feminism

- Romanticism: earliest, full of feeling and emotion. Not just romantic. Exaggeration of feelings; fear, aw, love, etc.

- Realism: CHOICE; the narrator has a moral choice.

- Naturalism: narrator has lack of choice; he is forced.

-Modernism: uncertainty.

Week 1 both
Week 2 both
Week 3 both
Week 4 both
Week 5 both
Week 6 both, “but regionalism” term is not on exam
Week 7 both
(pretty much everything before Feb 26)

“Historicism”: not a literary movement; it’s a way of analyzing literature.

-Ways to analyze literature:
Historicism
New Criticism
-Literary Movements (periods of literature): These are in order! Romanticism.
Realism
Naturalism
Modernism
Postmodernism

- Don’t worry about years, but know the order above for the different movements.

- know quotes and what literary movements they pair with, knowing what story it is from will help decide what literary term it is from.

- “The Nose” is not categorized as any; hard to classify - “The Lady With the Dog” is Realism***

Historicism – A mode of thinking in literary criticism that assigns a central importance to a specific context, such as historical period, geographical location, and evolving culture.

Especially important if you want…

To find out the motives behind an author’s writing.
To understand references that is no longer widely recognized. To infer the frame of mind of a work’s contemporary audience.

Historicism rejects…

The notion that all readers receive and process a piece of literature in the same way. Universal and fundamental interpretations of only the text.

Examples of evidence that might be used in literary criticism include:

An author’s biographical information, such as social and cultural views, written letters, and accounts of the author written by friends and relatives. Major events in history that was occurring at the same time the text was written, such as wars, migrations, or political movements. Shifting social and cultural perspectives and the emergence of new modes of thinking.

Romanticism – An artistic, literary, and intellectual movement during the 1800s characterized by an emphasis on emotions—awe, horror, love, melancholy— the sensual experiences of the everyday man (as opposed to the nobility), and a predilection for the uncommon, the surreal, and the fantastical.

Romanticism in literary works often…

Describes things using larger-than-life figurative language. “The Catskill mountains…are seen away to the west of the river, swelling up to a noble height, and lording over the surrounding country.” Make use of hyperbole. “A great elm tree spread its broad braches over it, at the foot of which bubbled up a spring of the softest and sweetest water…”

Characters in romantic works of literature…

Do not simply talk. They exclaim, cry, shout, pout, and cheer. “ ‘I am your father!’ cried he—‘Young Rip Van Winkle once—old Rip Van Winkle now!’ ”

Stories:
“Rip Van Winkle” by Washington Irving
The story itself is an escapist fantasy; Rip Van Winkle is an ineffectual male hero who cannot support his farm or family. Instead of facing the consequences of his idleness and facing his wife, who certainly makes the problem worse instead of better, he sleeps for twenty years. Finally, he is of such an age that his idleness is excusable and allowed. This makes him an antithesis to the American dream. He has no ambition, he does not work hard for himself, and he does not rise above where he began. He just likes to chat and have friends. Rip is: Lazy

Rip meets Judith Gardenier, Rip’s daughter
Bystanders start shouting at when Rip introduces himself because: Rip proclaims himself loyal to the king of England. “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving
Irving's legend takes place around 1790...
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