Jainism

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  • Topic: Jainism, Buddhism, Life
  • Pages : 1 (288 words )
  • Download(s) : 28
  • Published : April 17, 2013
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Jainism is a religion that involves a deep obligation to non-violence and being a devoted vegetarian. It also involved a deep respect for life and reverence for the purity and holiness of life. Devoted Jains believe that injury and pain to living creatures and nature are forbidden as it hinders their goal to liberation. Jains believe that the universe is never ending and that karma binds us to this universe. Karma are obstacles that stand in the way of spiritual liberation; commodities such as materialistic spoils and modernity are attachments to worldly realities. Jainism exists in East Africa, South India, and small communities in the United States. A Jain's occupation is usually a beggar or tradesmen. They live through bartering on on necessities given to them by other people. They choose this way of life because it injures the least lives as non-violence is the central ethical obligation and involves avoiding all harm to everything. Some Jains will sweep the ground in front of them with soft brooms and/or wear masks to avoid accidentally harming any insects or small creatures. The noble Jain practice is more of a self discipline and self purification process. It ultimately depends on the individual if he achieves liberation. He or she is willing to take on suffering (being hungry or starving) instead of harming anything else besides themselves. They try to live the best life they can under these circumstances. There are 2 groups of Jains. Digambara is the sect that is more conservative and are clad in air, the women are also believed to be incapable of attaining liberation. Svetambaras are more liberal, allowing monks to wear white clothing and the women to be ordained as nuns.
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