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Introduction to International Studies

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Introduction to International Studies

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Key terms:
* Behaviourism: A methodological approach to social science that emphasizes data collection and the scientific method. * colonialism: The political, economic, and cultural domination of African, American, Asian and Middle Eastern societies by European powers. * Conservative Nationalism: Leaders who seek to preserve their power and the socioeconomic order use pride in nation and fear of an enemy nation as a means to unify the masses and prevent domestic unrest.. * Culture: A learned system of meanings by which people orient themselves in the world so that they can act in it. Culture replies on a universal human capacity to differentiate and to categorize experience. * De-Colonization: the end of control by imperialist powers , which leads to the autonomy of the countries they formally controlled. * Democracy: A form of government rule in which leaders are chosen by some form of electoral process and that respects the rule of law. * Disciplinary: approaches connected to the traditional academic disciplines of history, political science, economics, geography and anthropology. * Empirical: Anthropological perspective that seeks to learn about human communities by direct observation and careful recording of information while living in and around those communities * idealism/liberalism: Theory that explains political behaviour as a function of moral human decisions, institutional structures, and collective interest. * Ideology: the mobilization of cultural symbols to create, sustain, or resist unequal distribution of rights, responsibilities, and control of resources in a society. * imperialism: political, economic and cultural domination of a country of area by another country. * Liberalism: The crucial tenets of liberalism include the following: (1) Humans have a capacity for good. (2) selfish and violent behaviours come not from human nature but from institutions that promote such behaviour. (3) The primary public...