Hum 111 Study Guide

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HUM 111 − World Cultures I
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course surveys the arts, literature, belief systems, and major events in the development of cultures around the globe from ancient times to the period of the European Renaissance.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS
Required Resources
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Sayre, H. M. (2012). The Humanities: Culture, continuity and change, Volume 1. (2 ed.). (2011 Custom Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.
MyArtsLab access code.
Supplemental Resources
Barnstone, T., Ed. (2003). Literatures of Asia. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Bottero, J. (1992). Mesopotamia: Writing, reasoning, and the gods. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Cohen, J. (2008). A history of western literature: From medieval epic to modern poetry. Piscataway, NJ: Aldine Transaction.

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McKenzie, L. (2000). Non-western art: A brief guide. (2 ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Plazy, G. (2001). The history of art in pictures: Western art from prehistory to the present. New York, NY: Sterling Publishing.

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. Explain how key social, cultural, and artistic contributions contribute to historical changes. 2. Explain the importance of situating a society’s cultural and artistic expressions within a historical context.

3. Examine the influences of intellectual, religious, political, and socio-economic forces on social, cultural, and artistic expressions.
4. Identify and describe key artistic styles in the visual arts of world cultures during the eras of antiquity to the Renaissance.
5. Identify and describe key literary works, styles, and writers from world cultures during the eras of antiquity to the Renaissance.
6. Identify and describe key musical styles from world cultures during the eras of antiquity to the Renaissance.
7. Identify major historical developments in world cultures during the eras of antiquity to the Renaissance.
8. Explore the presence of cultural parallels between the world’s cultures . 9. Use technology and information resources to research issue s in the study of world cultures. 10. W rite clearly and concisely about world cultures using proper writing mechanics.

©2012 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

HUM 111 Student Version 1122 (1071 9-30-2011)
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HUM 111 − World Cultures I
WEEKLY COURSE SCHEDULE
The standard requirement for a 4.5 credit hour course is for students to spend 13.5 hours in weekly work. This includes preparation, activities, and evaluation regardless of deliver y mode. Week
1

Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation

Points

Preparation


Reading(s): Chapters 2 and 3



e-Activity: Mesopotamian Writings. To prepare for Discussion 1, review MyArtsLab for Chapter 2
o Closer Look: Cuneiform Writing of Sumeria
o Explore the Web: British Museum of Mesopotamia -- W riting



e-Activity: Egypt. To prepare for Discussion 2, review MyArtsLab for Chapter 3
o Closer Look: Akhenaten and His Family and Temple of
Hatshepsut
o Video: Ancient Thebes with Its Necropolis
Activities
 Discussions
Evaluation

2

20

None

Preparation


Reading(s): Chapters 7 and 11



e-Activity: Tombs of Shihuangdi. To prepare for Discussion 1, review MyArtsLab for Chapter 7
o Closer Look: The Tomb of Shihuangdi



e-Activity: Buddhist Monuments. To prepare for Discussion 2, review MyArtsLab for Chapter 7 and Chapter 11
o Video: Buddhist monuments at Sanchi (Chapter 7)
o Video: Large Seated Buddha with Standing Bodhisattva
(Chapter 11)



e-Activity: Stone Sacred Centers. To prepare for Discussion 3, review MyArtsLab for Chapter 11
o Closer Look: Rock Hewn Churches of Lalibela
o Video: Pre-Hispanic City of Teotihuacán
o Video: Historic Sanctuary of...
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