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1.The beneficial consequences that may result from the legalization of euthanasia as proposed by brock are the following: a. serve as an insurance policy- it comforts patients by allowing them to know that it is there if they need it b. respect the self determination of individuals

c. provide a relief from prolonged suffering
d. make a dignified death possible

2.In his article on VA euthanasia, Brock examines two broad lines of arguments against euthanasia: a. deontological
b. utilitarian

3.People are generally opposed to killing because they have learned or been taught to think about it in negative terms. Killing is usually reported in the context of murder, not in the context of humanitarian service.

4.Allowing someone to die involves withholding intervention, when no cure is possible or withdrawing intervention because it is no longer able to cure a dying patient.

5.To the idea that active voluntary euthanasia is incompatible with a physician’s moral and professional commitment is to care for patients and protect life, Brock replies: the commitment to self determination and well being ought to be at the center of medical practice, not just preserving life.

6.To the objection that allowing euthanasia would undermine general confidence in health-care services providing optimal care for dying patients, Brock replies: There is no reason to fear that euthanasia is going to erode patients trust if only voluntary euthanasia is allowed.

7.Among the ethical considerations relating to genetic testing are the following: a. do parents have the right to be informed of all the results of a genetic test? b. does a person have a right to have children who are likely to be impaired? c. should public funds be used to pay for genetic testing when people are unable to pay?

8.Therapeutic sterilization is the termination of the ability to produce offspring if the mother’s life or mental health is in danger.

9.In the context of euthanasia, the slippery slope argument is the idea that it will eventually lead to a diminishing of our respect of life.

10.Abuses of laws permitting active euthanasia can be prevented by doing the following: a. make sure that it is the patient voluntarily making the decision to have it. b. make sure that there is no chance of recovery for the patient. c. the patient must feel that they are not being a burden to their family because of their illness.

11.Among the benefits of genetic testing are the following: a. improves the lives of the parents and at times, the child b. provides assistance for parents who wish to make rational decisions regarding their family planning

12.Ethical considerations with surrogate motherhood include the following: a. is it right to ask a surrogate mother to give up all rights to a baby she carried for nine months? b. potential court battles over custody of a child conceived outside of marriage. c. future emotional distress when the child learns that they were deliberately taken away from their natural mother.

13.Extraordinary care means when caring for a comatose patient, one should include: B. CPR, mechanical breathing

14.The set of conditions that must be present to determine if a patient is an irreversible coma is known as the Harvard Criteria.

15.The care given to terminally ill patients that consist of comfort measures and symptom control is referred to as palliative care.

16.The Baby M case is an example of:
C. problems encountered as a result of the use of a surrogate

17.An infertile couple who does not wish to adopt has the option of surrogate motherhood.

18.While the goal of therapeutic genetic interventions is to restore the patient to the best state of health as possible, the goal of nontherapeutic or enhancement genetic engineering is to improve on an otherwise healthy body.

19.A viable infant is one who is able to survive after birth.

20.Provide examples of ordinary versus extraordinary means...
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