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China in Africa

International Programmes Stellenbosch University

2013 (first semester)
Lecture / Seminar time: Tuesdays 10:00 -13:00

Lecturer: Steven C. Kuo
stevecykuo@yahoo.com

Course Description
This course introduces students to the study of China in Africa and the relations between Chinese and African states as well as Chinese and African non-state actors. The re-emergence of China has begun to affect most facets of the current western-dominated international system. For Africa, the rapid rise of China is the most important international relations development since the end of the Cold War. Despite a great deal of interest and attention in the relationship between China and Africa shown in the media and by civil society and governments, there remains a great deal of mystery and misinformation about the nature of the relationship(s) between Beijing and different actors in Africa. This course examines and moves beyond the dichotomy of China in Africa as either ‘threat’ or ‘opportunity’ and students will examine the nuances of this emerging, complex relationship. The course is divided into two halves. In the first half, students are guided through readings drawn from Chinese history; Chinese foreign policy analysis; international relations theory; neopatrimonialism and the history between China and the Third World. In the second half, students examine specific case studies concerning China in Africa. They include: Chinese approach to aid and development in Africa; the Chinese in Sudan; Chinese approach to human rights in Africa, China’s alternative approach to peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peacemaking on the continent and oil politics.

Learning outcomes:
At the conclusion of the course, diligent students should be able to: * Understand the motivations and limitations of the African policy of the People’s Republic of China, and how it has evolved over the past six decades. * Be aware of, and have the ability to discern historical, ideational, realist and other factors that shape China’s African policy in the context of the international system. * Come to a critical and informed position on China’s rise and China’s role in the world. * Understand the potentialities and limitations of international relations in sub-Saharan African countries. * Be able to identify and analyze specific issues concerning Sino-Africa relations.

Teaching method
This course consists of lectures and class discussions. The lectures will provide a framework and introduce the scholarship, and will guide the students towards formulating their own positions on China and Africa. Class discussion will require significant student participation in presenting, discussing and debating the issues presented. Students are to have studied each week’s readings in advance, and must come to class with a two-page synopsis of the readings. Course requirements

Attendance of all lectures and class discussions is compulsory. A class attendance register will be kept. The course will be assessed by one class test (10%), presentation (10%), one research essay assignment (40%) and the final exam. The assignment should be between 2500 to 3000 words in length.

Stay Informed
In addition to scanning the major western newspaper websites’ Asia and Africa sections, read the following websites for a broader range of perspectives. African news websites
The Daily Maverick (http://dailymaverick.co.za/)
South African Foreign Policy Innitiative (http://www.safpi.org/) Pambazuka News (http://www.pambazuka.org/en/)
City Press (http://www.citypress.co.za/)
This Day (http://www.thisdaylive.com/) [based in Nigeria]
Chinese state media
People’s Daily (http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/home.html) Xinhua (http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/)
China Daily (http://www2.chinadaily.com.cn/)
News websites that provide good analysis of Chinese politics South China Morning Post (http://www.scmp.com) [based in Hong Kong]...
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