Corporal Punishment

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Discipline: Can corporal punishment help discipline children? [Add New]
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Corporal punishment is a good tool for disciplining unruly children Walter Williams. "Making a Case for Corporal Punishment". Bnet. Sept 13, 1999: "Regardless of what the experts preached, the undeniable fact is the 'uncivilized' practice of whipping children produced more civilized young people. Youngsters didn't direct foul language to, or use it in the presence of, teachers and other adults. In that 'uncivilized' era, assaulting a teacher or adult never would have crossed our minds. Today, foul language and assaults against teachers are routine in many schools. For some kinds of criminal behavior, I think we'd benefit from having punishment along the lines of Singapore's caning as a part of our judicial system."

Corporal punishment can ethically help save a child's future Walter Williams. "Making a Case for Corporal Punishment". Bnet. Sept 13, 1999: "Let's think about cruelty. Today, it's not uncommon for young criminals to be arrested, counseled and released to the custody of a parent 20 or 30 times before they spend one night in jail. Such a person is a very good candidate for later serving a long prison sentence or, worse, facing the death penalty. If you interviewed such a person and asked: "Thinking back to when you started your life of crime, would you have preferred a punishment, such as caning, that might have set you straight or be where you are today?" I'd bet my retirement money that he'd say he wished someone had caned some sense into him. That being the case, which is more cruel: caning or allowing such a person to become a criminal?"

Corporal punishment can make a valuable example of a student Oscar Goodman: "I also believe in a little bit of corporal punishment going back to the days of yore, where examples have to be shown."[1]

General statements in support of corporal punishment Mark Benedict, Christian Family Foundations: "I also believe the scriptural reference to the 'rod' best corresponds to a switch or perhaps a flexible paddle."[2]

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It is dubious that corporal punishment helps discipline children. Even the power of physical punishment to teach a child the difference between right and wrong is dubious; a young child may learn that the adult is displeased, but not why. Spanking will cause a state of extreme distress and confusion which makes it less likely they will analyse their behaviour with clarity. In older children disciplined at school, a physical punishment is likely to provoke resentment and further misbehaviour.

Corporal punishment can lower a child's IQ "Child Corporal Punishment: Spanking. The anti-spanking position". Religious tolerance: "Spanking lowers a child's IQ: A study at the University of New Hampshire, released in 1998-JUL, found that spanking children apparently slows down their intellectual development. 3 A study of 960 children found an average 4 point reduction in IQ among students, from and average IQ of 102 (above average) for children who are not spanked, to an average IQ 98 (below average) for who are. A reduction of 4 points is enough to have a significant negative functional effect on the students. More information."

Corporal punishment hampers children's creativity Ms. Dawn Walker, executive director of the Canadian Institute of Child Health commented: "We know that children who are under the threat of violence or aggression develop a fight-or-flight response system that has an impact on creativity and imagination, both of which could influence their IQ...Children need discipline but not hitting."[3]

Corporal punishment creates anti-social behavior. Andrew Grogan-Kaylor, University of Michigan. "Even minimal amounts of spanking can lead to an increased likelihood in antisocial behavior by children."[4] Corporal punishment fosters violence in society.

General statements...
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