Contemporary Hospitality

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Contemporary Hospitality Industry

Abstract

As a Consultant manager of a hospitality consulting company, I have made this report to throw light on the hospitality industry. This report aims to provide information to all those new and aspiring owners’ of the hospitality business who aims to know the pros and cons of hospitality industry.

I have made a genuine effort to include the present day hospitality industry scenario, its structure, the strength and weaknesses of the industry in an event of crisis, etc. I sincerely believe my humble work will be beneficial and educative to the new beginners in of hospitality sector.

Content

Abstract| | | | | 1|
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Main body| | | | | 3|
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Conclusion| | | | | 23|
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Reference| | | | | 24|
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Bibliography| | | | | 25|

Main body

Task1 – (LO1)
a) Describe the scope of the accommodation sector within the hospitality industry.

Answer1a: Accommodation is an inseparable part of hospitality industry. Hospitality industry consists of accommodation plus food & beverage, both of which are necessities of people living out of their home.

Since people travel for different purposes, the purpose of their journey necessitates the demand for different types of accommodation. According to Jones (2002), “different sources of demand for accommodation include:

* Government officials
* Business travellers
* Leisure travellers
* Tour groups
* Conference participants
* Other users”

Accommodation can mainly be divided into 2 parts. They are:- i. Catered: Catered accommodation is the one where the customers are looked after. Their need of food and beverage are provided by the people offering accommodation. Following are the types of catered accommodation.

* Hotel: Hotel is common type of accommodation which is characterised by its location, varieties of functions like rooms, bar, restaurant, leisure services within it. Hotels have their image and branding, quality of service and are priced accordingly. According to the customer demand the hotels are further classified.

* Business: Business hotels are near the workplaces, event and conference centres, airports, etc. E.g. – Hotel Hilton at Canary Wharf, etc. “66% of business travellers use hotels” (Jones, 1996: 38)

* Resort: Resort hotels are known for its leisure facilities. These hotels push for sustainable products to attract and appeal eco conscious travellers. E.g. - Centre Parcs. “Destinations in their own right…completely self-contained.” (Roper, ibid Jones, 1996: 50).

* Budget: These are low cost high service quality hotels for customers with low disposable income. E.g.- Hotel ibis, Travelodge, Premium inn, etc.

* Boutique: Boutique hotels are lively, chic hotels with personalised service, unique architecture and design usually in trendy neighbourhood and lively cities. E.g. - Firmdale hotels in Charlotte Street, Soho, etc.

* Guesthouse: Guesthouses are rather old-fashioned but still welcoming, situated at attractive locations. These are for Value for money (VFM) customers.

* B&B: Located both at rural and city, B&B is the cheap option for short trips. They have personalised service, rooms in renovated or small hotels and very common in seaside resorts. E.g. - Blackpool, Brighton, etc.

* Farmhouse: Being simple and comfortable, farmhouses attracts families and city workers looking for new experience. They are much similar to B&B’s in terms of service and often offer work on farms. It is an example of agric-tourism.

ii. Self-catered: In the case of...
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