Code of Humarabbi

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What is the code- when- where-why?

is a well-preserved Babylonian law code, dating back to about 1772 BC. The Code deals with matters of contract, establishing for example the wages to be paid to an ox driver or a surgeon. It set the terms of a transaction, establishing the liability of a builder for a house that collapses, for example, or property that is damaged while left in the care of another. A third of the code addresses issues concerning household and family relationships such as inheritance, divorce, paternity and sexual behavior.

From 1792 to 1750 BC, old babylonian period.

The code is seen as an early example of a fundamental law regulating a government like a primitive constitution.

What is the code's significance:

So that everyone who read the laws would know what was required of them. It gave the civilization a standard to base their actions off of.

How many parts:

There are 44 columns and 28 paragraphs that contained over 282 laws.

Which quote seems the most common sensical to todays standard:

“If a man has broken into a house he shall be killed before the breach and buried there” Law 21. This could be in use for the bearing arms rights america has. Gun to protect ourselves and our homes incase of intruders.

Which one quote seems the most divergent from todays standards:

“If a man has stolen goods from a temple, or house, he shall be put to death; and he that has received the stolen property from him shall be put to death.” Law 6

Our judicial system does not support death for a robbery and would either make the person pay a fine or do some jail time.

Which one quote caused you to laugh and or smile:

“If a man has caught either a male or female runaway slave in the open field and has brought him back to his owner, the owner of the slave shall give him two shekels of silver.”

Seems like a quick way to make money.

What is the value of studying the Code of Hammurabi for History 321: Its very...
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