Catcher in the Rye

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Chapter One

I can relate to Holden Caulfiled because he refuses to talk about his early life. I do not like to talk about my early life because those memories can be very emotional.
Holden seems to not like his brother D.B. because he hints that he is bitter because he sold out to Hollywood. Unlike me, my brother and I get along very well.
Holden also goes to a private school called Pencey Prep, and does not seem to like it. He is failing many of his classes. I am a bright kid, but I do not do as well as I am able to in school either mostly because I just get lazy to do the work, and hold things off to the last minutes.

Holden has no interest in football. The Saturday before Christmas vacation begins, Holden stands on Thomsen Hill overlooking the football field, where Pencey plays its annual grudge match against Saxon Hall. I love football, and play for the varsity football team at High School. Chapter Two

There was not much I could relate to or talk about in this chapter because the chapter is very short. However, the important quote “Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules” is introduced in this chapter. Life definitely is a game that everyone has to play everyday. Depending on what you do in life, the rules change. For example, living in the United States, you have more freedom and can do mostly whatever you want. However, under a dictatorship you do not have many rights, and women are not treated equally. Chapter Three & Four

Chapter three is also a short chapter. We are introduced to another quote: “‘This is a people shooting hat,’ I said. ‘I shoot people in this hat.’”
These chapters establish the way Holden interacts with his peers. Holden despises “phonies”—people whose surface behavior distorts or disguises their inner feelings. Even his brother D. B. incurs his displeasure by accepting a big paycheck to write for the movies; Holden considers the movies to be the phoniest of the phony and emphasizes throughout the book the loathing he has for Hollywood.

The quote is significant because Holden does not get along with his peers. Holden is surrounded by phonies in his prep school. Holden especially does not like Stradlater, but despite their problems and flaws, he acts with basic kindness towards them.

Holden cares deeply for a girl names Jane Gallagher, but Stradlater is currently going out with her. I can relate to the feeling of liking someone but that person is already with someone else. Chapter Five and Chapter Six

After a dry and unappetizing steak dinner in the dining hall, Holden gets into a snowball fight with some of the other boys at his private school, Pencey Prep. When is snows in Long Island, I love to go out and get into snowball fights with everyone.

I found the part where Ackley squeezes his pimples and concocting stories about a girl he claims to have had sex with disgusting.
I was surprised by Holden’s kindness to Ackley because there was disdain that Holden had expressed towards him in the past two chapters. Though he continues to complain about Ackley, the sympathy he feels for his next-door-neighbor is evident when he convinces Mal Brossard to let Ackley join them at the movies.

Throughout the novel, it became clear that Allie’s death was one of the most traumatic experiences of Holden’s life and may play a major role on his psychological breakdown.

Holden seems to feel increasing pressure as he moves toward leaving school. I have never experienced this sort of pressure when school years end. I am the opposite: I get excited to get out of school and look forward to the summer.

Holden finally snaps with all this increased pressure and attacks his roommate, Stradlater. Stradlater easily overpowers Holden. Chapters Seven, Eight and Nine

So far in the novel, I have figured that the novel is a chronicle of Holden Caulfield’s emotional breakdown, but Holden never comments on it directly. I have never had...
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