Broadsheets vs Tabloid

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Eng. 1 Study and Thinking Skills

Comparing a Tabloid and a Broadsheet Newspaper
Introduction :
The purpose of my research is to examine the differences between a broadsheet and a tabloid in detail. The first thing you notice when you look at a newspaper is the size! Traditionally, newspapers have been divided up into tabloids and broadsheets, broadsheets being the larger, more serious papers that you have to fold to read. The gap between tabloids and broadsheets is a wide one. They look different, they contain different news, they have a different style of writing and they aim to attract different readers. However, the competition for readers is intense, and tabloids and broadsheets may steal tricks off each other in order to win the circulation war.

What is a Broadsheet?

The term “broadsheet” is used both to refer to a generic paper size, and to specific types of publications which have historically been produced on broadsheets. The classic example of a broadsheet is a wide-circulation newspaper, with the broadsheet size being preferred by many newspaper publishers. Newspapers which are intended to act as major news authorities are classically printed on broadsheet-sized pieces of paper.

The Size :

Unlike many other paper sizes, which include very precise dimensions, the dimension of a broadsheet can actually vary considerably. As a general rule, the sheets are vertically long and short horizontally, with a length of at least 22 inches (56 centimeters) and a width which can vary. In a full broadsheet, a sheet of paper is printed and folded to create four pages, a front and back and two inner pages. A half broadsheet is a single piece of paper printed on both sides with no fold. For convenience in distribution, broadsheets are often folded in half lengthwise, but the fold does not impact the page count. The origins of this paper size appear to lie in the 1600s, when early newspapers began printing half broadsheets with major news of note. The broadsheet size was also used for song lyrics, posters, and other informational materials. Over time, news producers began to adopt the full broadsheet, and eventually additional sheets were interleaved to create the newspaper. “Broadsheet” was used to refer to newspapers as well as advertising materials printed on broadsheet-sized paper.

What is a tabloid?

A tabloid is a small newspaper with stories often exaggerated, with its own language and style. Stories are regularly about crime, celebrities, sex, blood, murder, scandal and the lives of the rich and famous. Bandera is a type of journalism that consists of fictional news than factual. The style is used with colorful adjectives, exaggeration and maybe falsification of incidents. Adjectives and verbs are a big part of tabloid journalism. Tabloids don’t use the usual adjectives; they must be exaggerated to grab attention.

The size:

In terms of paper size, a tabloid is about the size of a large magazine, with a depth of around 14 inches (36 centimeters) and a width of around 10 inches (25 centimeters). The tabloid is essentially half the size of the larger broadsheet format, making it much more compact and easy to handle. The precise paper size can very slightly, depending on the nation and the newspaper involved. Here are a few of the main differences:

Tabloids eg Standard| Broadsheets eg SCMP|
* 'Popular' press * Aimed at lower social groupings (C2,D & E) * Bold layout (eg colour on the masthead, very bold typeface, easy to read), with large, dramatic pictures * Shorter articles, more pictures, less 'in-depth' reporting * Puns and jokes in headlines * More focus on human interest stories, celebrity gossip * Use of gimmicks such as bingo games, free travel tickets, phone-in surveys  | * 'Quality' or 'serious' press * Aimed at higher social groupings (A,B,C1) * Plainer layout (no colour on the frontpage, smaller typeface suggests readers will make more effort to read...
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