Born to Be Good Chapter 1 Sumarry

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 70
  • Published : December 11, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Ethan Gameren
Psychology 370
September 24, 2012

Personal Viewpoint of Chapter One of ‘Born To Be Good – The science of a meaningful life,’ by Dacher Keltner

Anton Van Leeuwenhoek conducted the first microbiological observance in the fifteenth century with such an utterly eccentric sense of curiosity, which it led to a field of study that would change the world forever. I interpret the sudden change of subject from the first to second paragraph as a simile that the new topic of ‘jen science’ will, too, alter the world in a way that will disable our ability to ever overlook this new realm of science.

Jen science seems to be a mix of a concept outlined by Confucius and, in a more contemporary light, a field of research gaining momentum as its empowering fundamentals seem to gain more credence through empirical studies. The concept itself is empowering and uplifting; its ability to enable people to mathematically equate all emotional human activity and give it a rating is, to me, very exciting. In an oversimplified nutshell, my understanding is that you can simply divide all queues for happiness by those contrary to it, however stark or subtle these factors may be. Initial explanation of the concept goes on to explain that the finished ratio is a rather essential underlying indicator of the measuring human emotional well-being. The passages relating to the tendencies of humankind to dwell stronger toward negative aspects of life is very bleak and, to me, holds incredible integrity.

There is a subliminal tone throughout the chapter that humankind really can be what the title implies: kind. The content consistently punches on the habitual lives we live as being purely serving self-interest. However I perceive that this is antagonistically challenged by what I assume the central theme of this literature will be: we have something more to us than just serving our seemingly genetic propensity of self-interest. This something may perhaps befuddle the...
tracking img