Asl Paper Cambridge Example

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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS General Certificate of Education Advanced Subsidiary Level and Advanced Level

LITERATURE IN ENGLISH Paper 3 Poetry and Prose Additional Materials: *7201044287*

9695/03
October/November 2008 2 hours

Answer Booklet/Paper

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST If you have been given an Answer Booklet, follow the instructions on the front cover of the Booklet. Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in. Write in dark blue or black pen. Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid. Answer one question from Section A and one question from Section B. You are reminded of the need for good English and clear presentation in your answers. At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together. All questions in this paper carry equal marks.

This document consists of 8 printed pages and 4 blank pages. SP (NH) T53876/1 © UCLES 2008

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2 Section A: Poetry

SUJATA BHATT: Point No Point 1 Either (a) It has been said that Bhatt’s poems focused on India are less successful than those based on her experiences elsewhere. By comparing two poems, say whether you find this to be true. (b) Comment closely on the following poem, paying particular attention to its portrayal of a child’s perception of the world. Genealogy My daughter when she was four once described herself as a tiny egg, so small, she was inside me at a time when I was still not born when I was still within her grandmother. And so, she concluded triumphantly, I was also inside Aaji. When she showed me her newest painting, she said: At night the sun is black and the moon turns yellow. Look, that’s how I painted it. This is the sky at night so the sun is also black. What are the angels doing at night? It’s not bad to die because then you can become an angel – and you can fly and that’s so nice – I’ll be happy to be an angel. Later, I overheard her say to her father: When I am a grandmother I’ll be very old and you’ll be dead. But I hope you’ve learned to fly by that time because then you can fly over to my house and watch me with my grandchildren.

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3 Songs of Ourselves (Section 4) 2 Either (a) With reference to two poems, discuss the ways the poets make universal comments out of their personal reflections and experiences. (b) Discuss the following poem in detail, exploring its concerns with identity and place. Where I Come From People are made of places. They carry with them hints of jungles or mountains, a tropic grace or the cool eyes of sea-gazers. Atmosphere of cities how different drops from them, like the smell of smog or the almost-not-smell of tulips in the spring, nature tidily plotted in little squares with a fountain in the centre; museum smell, art also tidily plotted with a guidebook; or the smell of work, glue factories maybe, chromium-plated offices; smell of subways crowded at rush hours. Where I come from, people carry woods in their minds, acres of pine woods; blueberry patches in the burned-out bush; wooden farmhouses, old, in need of paint, with yards where hens and chickens circle about, clucking aimlessly; battered schoolhouses behind which violets grow. Spring and winter are the mind’s chief seasons: ice and the breaking of ice. A door in the mind blows open, and there blows a frosty wind from fields of snow. Elizabeth Brewster

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4 WILLIAM WORDSWORTH: Selected Poetry 3 Either (a) With reference to two poems, discuss the importance of solitude in Wordsworth’s poetry. (b) Comment closely on the following passage, paying particular attention to how it develops Wordsworth’s characteristic concerns. One evening (surely I was led by her) I went alone into a Shepherd’s Boat, A Skiff that to a Willow tree was tied Within a rocky Cave, its usual home. ’Twas by the shores...
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