Appeals of Advertising by Jib Fowles

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Classification of content will be sufficient to reverseits hideouseffects.What is currentlyunder discussionin our nationalhysteriaaboutfailing academic performance misses the point. Schools teach exactly what they are intended to teach and they do it well: how to be a good Egyptian and remain in your place in the pyramid. F W QUESTIONS OREVALUATING RIT'ING l. ldentily the thesisstatement. Doesit tell thereaders whatthey will encounterin the essay? 2. Identify the supporting lllustrations. Does the writer .show the readers specificexamples illustrate pointf to his 3. Identify the placeswhere the writer is explaining.Doesthe writer clearly explain how the illustrationsprovided supporthis/her point (and/ormessage)? 4. Identify how the writer structures essay. his Did he chosea structure that suits his message and/or purpose? 5. What did the writer do well?

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6. What suggestions would you give this writer to improve essay? his

Activity AnnotatingProfessional 18: a Writer's ol Classification Use Directions: Read and annotate the article very carefrrlly. Answer the questionsabout the article.

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EMOTIONAL APPEALS

Appeals

The nahrre of effective advertisementswas recqgnizedfirll well by the late media philosopher Marshall Mcluhan. In his {lnderstanding

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*Reprinted Advertising Popular publications, from and cultureby permission Sage of Inc.Copvright 1996 JibFowles. by

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Classification Media, the first sentenceof the section on advertising reads, "The continuous pressureis to create ads more and more in the image of audiencemotives and desires." By giving form to people's deep-lying desires,and picturing statesof being that individuals privately yearn for, advertisershave the best chanceof arrestingattentionand affecting communication. And that is the immediate goal of advertising: to tug at our psychological shirt sleeves and slow us down long enoughfor a word or two about whatever is being sold. We glance at a picture of a solitary rancher at work, and "Marlboro?'slips into our minds. Advertisers (I'm using the term as a shorthand for both the products'manufacturers,who bring the ambition and money to the process,and the advertising agencies,who supply the know-how,1 are ever more compelledto invoke consumers'drives and longings; "continuous pressure" this is the Mcluhan refers to. Over the past century, the American marketplace has grown increasingly congested as more and more products have entered into the frenzied competition after the public's dollars. The economies of other nations are quieter than ours since the volume of goods being hawked does not so greatly exceed demand. In some economies, consumerwares are scarceenough that no advertisingat all is necessary.But in the United States, we go to the other extreme. In order to stay in business,an advertisermust strive to cut through the considerablecommercial hub-bub by any means availableincluding the emotional appealsthat some observershave held to be abhorrent and underhandedThe use of subconscious appealsis a comment not only on conditions among sellers. As time has gone by, buyers have become stoutly resistantto advertisements. live in ablizzardof thesemesWe sagesand have learned to turn up our collars and ward offmost of them. A study done a few yearsago at Harvard University's Graduate School of Business Administration venfured that the average American is exposed to some 500 ads daily from television, newspapers,magazines,radio, billboards, direct mail, and so on. If for no other reasonthan to preserveone's sanity,a filter must be developed in every mind to lower the number of ads a person is achrally aware

C'lassification of-a number this particular study estimated at about seventy-five ads per day. (Of these, only fwelve typically produced a reactionnine positive and three negative, on the average.)To be among the few messagesthat do manage to gain accessto minds, advertisers must be...
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