Ancient Egyptian Culture

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Contents
* Preface
* Egyptian Culture & Society
* Egyptian Culture & Society - The Social Pyramid of Power * Egyptian Culture and Society - The Nobles
* Jobs - The Court Officials
* Jobs - The Priests and Priestesses
* Jobs - The Soldiers
* The Literary Class
* Egyptian Culture and Society - The Multitude
* Egyptian Culture and Society - Promotion
* Jobs - State Employment
* Egyptian Culture and Society - The Laborers
* Ancient Egyptian society
* Ancient Egyptian society- Diet
* Ancient Egyptian society- Clothing Crowns and Regalia
* Ancient Egyptian society- Jewellery Perfume and Incense * Ancient Egyptian society- Administration
* Ancient Egyptian society- Military
* Ancient Egyptian society- Animals in ancient Egypt
* Ancient Egyptian society- Burial practices in ancient Egypt * 15 Fascinating facts about ancient Egypt
* The Historical View
* The Historical View- Beginnings of Civilizations
* The Historical View- Unification and early dynastic Period * The Historical View- Old kingdom and first intermediate period * The Historical View- Middle kingdom and second intermediate period * The Historical View- New kingdom, third intermediate period and late period * References

Preface Ancient Egypt, civilization that thrived along the Nile River in northeastern Africa for more than 3,000 years, from about 3300 BC to 30 BC. It was the longest-lived civilization of the ancient world. Geographically, the term ancient Egypt indicates the territory where the ancient Egyptians lived in the valley and delta of the Nile. Culturally, it refers to the ways ancient Egyptians spoke, worshiped, understood the nature of the physical world, organized their government, made their livings, entertained themselves, and related to others who were not Egyptian. The Nile River, which formed the focus of ancient Egyptian civilization, originates in the highlands of East Africa and flows northward throughout the length of what are now Sudan and Egypt. Northwest of modern-day Cairo, it branches out to form a broad delta, through which it empties into the Mediterranean Sea. Because of seasonal rains farther south in Africa, the Nile overflowed its banks in Egypt every year. When the floodwaters receded, a rich black soil covered the floodplain. This natural phenomenon and its effects on the environment enabled the ancient Egyptians to develop a successful economy based on agriculture. The Egyptian society was the only one in the area to endure for thousands of years. Each of its rivals rose to power but ultimately faded from importance. It was in this land that two of the Seven Wonders of the World were found: the pyramids at Giza and the lighthouse at Alexandria. The ancient Egyptians produced a vast body of written records, including ethical and moralistic treatises, instructional texts, religious and magical scrolls, evocative love poetry, epic stories, and ribald tales. They possessed a sophisticated understanding of mathematics and the principles of architecture, enabling them to introduce to the world large stone buildings before 2500 BC. Their enduring images—sculpted, painted, and drawn—captivate viewers even today. The ancient Egyptians processed thin flat sheets from the papyrus, a plant that grew along the Nile, and on these paper like sheets they wrote their texts. Their earliest script, now known as hieroglyphs, began as a type of picture writing in which the symbols took the form of recognizable images. They originated many basic concepts in arithmetic and geometry, as well as the study of medicine and dentistry. They devised a calendar on the basis of their observations of the Sun and the stars. Although the ancient Egyptians worshiped many gods, Egypt is also often recognized as the origin of the first recorded monotheist (worshiper of one god), the king who called...
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