Acne

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Acne
Acne is defined as an inflammatory disease of the sebaceous glands and hair follicles of the skin which is apparent by small or big pimples or pustules on the face or body. Acne is a problem that can affect almost everyone’s life. There are a few different types of acne. Whiteheads and Blackheads

The first types of acne are whiteheads and blackheads. Whiteheads are caused when pores are blocked with sebum, an oily secretion that our bodies produce naturally. Blackheads are similar to whiteheads but are exposed to air and when the sebum oxidizes it causes the black appearance. Papules and Pustules

Papules are red bumps that are usually tender to the touch and are not filled with anything. A pustule is an elevation in a skin but is filled with pus. Pustules appear like an inflamed mountain with a white center surrounded by inflamed red skin. Both papules and pustules are inflammatory acne. Nodules and Cysts

Nodules are characterized as hard lumps which are formed under the skin. They develop at a deeper level then the other forms of acne and take a longer time to heal. Cysts are similar to nodules and form when sebum and bacteria leak into the hair follicle. Both are usually hard red lumps and can be painful to the touch. For a visual look of acne please see Figure 1. Figure 1-Types of Acne

This description will examine the:
* Causes
* Treatment
Causes
Acne can occur when hair follicles are plugged with oil and dead skin cells. Three different factors can contribute to acne formation: * Excessive production of oil(sebum) in skin
* Excessive amounts of bacteria in the skin
* Abnormal shedding of dead skin cells

Excessive Oil in Skin
The sebaceous glands produce oil called sebum that lubricates hair and skin. But when the body produces excess sebum and dead skin cells they can both build up in the hair follicles and form a plug.

What causes excess sebum?
* Excessive sebum can be caused by hormones. During puberty...
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